Bridget Sullivan Trial Testimony

Bridget Sullivan Trial Testimony

Trial Testimony - June 7, 1893, New Bedford, Mass. Beginning page 192 of the Trial Transcript.

DIRECT EXAMINATION.

Q. (By Mr. Moody.) What is your full name?

A. Bridget Sullivan.

Q. And were you in the Borden household sometimes called Maggie?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. By whom were you called Maggie, by the whole family?

A. Nosir.

Q. By whom?

A. By Lizzie and Emma.

Q. By Miss Emma and Miss Lizzie? A. Yes, sir.

Q. Won't you be kind enough to tell us how old you are, Miss Sullivan?

A. 26 years old.

Q. I believe you never have been married?

A. No, sir.

Q. How long have you been in this country?

A. Six years last May.. seven years last May.

Q. And where were you born? A. In Ireland.

Q. And came here seven years ago?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Came to what part of this country?

A. I came to Newport.

Q. Newport, Rhode Island?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you have any folks here when you came here?

A. No, sir.

Q. Father, mother, brother or sisters?

A. No, sir.

Q. And have you any here now?

A. No, sir. I ain't got no folks here, no more than relations.

Q. When you went to Newport did you stay there quite a while?

A. Twelve months.

Q. And from Newport where did you go?

A. I went out to South Bethlehem.

Q. That was in Pennsylvania?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. When did you come to Fall River?

A. I came there four years -- I was two years out when I came to Fall River; two years in America when I came to Fall River.

Q. Did you go to the Bordens the first place in Fall River?

A. No, sir. I went to Mrs. Reed.

Q. When did you go to work for Mr. Borden?

A. I was there two years and nine months.

Q. At the time of his death?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Was there any other domestic servant in the family except yourself?

A. No, sir, not while I was there.

Q. Or was there any man who worked there while you were there taking care of a horse or anything of that sort?

A. No, sir. There was a man on the farm who used to come there and do chores, and go back again.

Q. He came from the farm?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. What was his name?

A. His first name was Alfred. I don't know his last name. I never asked him.

Q. While I am upon that subject I will ask you about the barn. While you were there was it used at all for anything?

A. They had a horse there while I was there.

Q. And when did they cease to have any horse there?

A. I guess it was about a year before that, as far as I can remember.

Q. You mean before the homicides?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Before the death of Mr. Borden?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. After the horse had been discontinued, did they use the barn for anything?

A. No, sir, I don't think they did.

Q. There was some hay in the barn. Was that hay that had been left over from the time that the horse had been kept there?

A. I suppose so. I don't know.

Q. Did you know of any hay being put in after the horse had been sold or disposed of?

A. No, sir, I don't remember.

Q. Perhaps you can tell us while I am on the barn, how that front door runs. Does it go on wheels? Is it a sliding door or is it a door that opens?

A. It opens.

Q. Works on hinges,?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. That is the front door of the barn facing the street, I mean?

A. The front door facing the street goes on hinges, I think.

Q. The carriage door, I mean, that faces the street. (Exhibiting photograph.) You can see it there.

A. Well, I don't know. I never have been in that door, I think.

Q. Have you ever seen that door open?

A. Yes, sir. I don't know but I saw it open.

Q. Do you know whether it was kept locked or not?

A. I don't know anything about it.

Q. Had you seen it open recently before the death of Mr. Borden, or do you mean that you saw it open when they had a horse and carriage?

A. I saw it open a while before the death of the Bordens while some man was looking at some carriages that was there, I guess.

Q. How long was that before their death?

A. I can't remember.

Q. Some days or weeks?

A. Some weeks.

Q. Had you seen it since that time?

A. No, sir, I don't remember.

Q. What were your general duties in the household, Miss Bridget?

A. Washing, ironing and cooking, with sweeping.

Q. Did you have the care of any of the chambers?

A. No, sir.

Q. Except your own, I suppose?

A. That is all.

Q. You slept in the third story of the house?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Can you tell us the position of the room that you slept in?

A. Well, it is right over Mr. Borden's room.

Q. And Mr. Borden's room is right over the kitchen?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Who did the chamber work in Mr. Borden's room and Mrs. Borden's?

A. I don't know. Themselves did it. I don't know which of them.

Q. That is, you didn't do it?

A. No, sir.

Q. Did either of the daughters do it?

A. No, sir.

Q. Perhaps this will aid us in fixing the room. In what way does your window look?

A. It looks out on the back yard.

Q. Directly into the rear of the house?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. (Exhibiting photograph.) Will you look at that photograph and see if you m point out the windows in your room? Take time enough so that you will understand it.

backyard Borden house

A. I don't know. If that ain't it. I can't explain it.

Q. If it confuses you, quite likely it may, I won't refer to it. Is it one of those windows in the third story?

A. Yes, sir, two rooms. The room next to it had one window in it, and two windows leads out in the back yard.

Q. Do you know whether your room is the room next to Mrs. Churchill's house or next to Mrs. Kelly's house?

A. Next to Mrs. Kelly's house.

Q. Who occupied the other room, if any one? Did any one?

A. No, sir, excepting when the hired man slept there. Sometimes Mr. Morse slept there.

Q. Do you know who took charge of the room in the front part of the house?

A. Well, when Miss Emma was home she done it. When Mr. Morse was there and when Mrs. Borden had any of her friends there, I guess she done it or helped do it, that is, as far as I can remember.

Q. That is the front chamber you are talking about?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now, do you know who took care of the rooms, belonging to the daughters or occupied by the daughters?

A. Themselves took care of them, as far as I know.

Q. And did that care include sweeping and dusting as well as making the beds?

A. Yes, sir. I didn't have anything to do with the rooms.

Q. You had nothing of any kind to do with any bedroom?

A. No, sir.

Q. Had you known Mr. Morse before the time of Mr. Borden's death?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. How long had you known him?

A. I can't remember how long, --- quite a while.

Q. He had occasionally come to the house, had he?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And stayed over night?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Can you tell who took charge of the parlor sweeping, dusting and cleaning of it?

A. Miss Lizzie in the summer.

Q. Did you have anything to do with it?

A. No, sir.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Morse's coming to the house on the Wednesday the day before the death?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you see him?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. When did you see him on the Wednesday?

A. Well, I could not exactly tell whether it was two o'clock or after two or before two,

but after dinner.

Q. Where did he come from, --- what door?

A. Came in the back door.

Q. Who let him in?

A. I don't know; I can't remember who let him in. I think Mrs. Borden, -- I cannot tell, but I saw the man coming in.

Q. Did you get any dinner for him?

A. No, sir.

Q. Do you know whether any dinner was got for him?

A. Mrs. Borden did.

Q. Did you clean up the dishes after dinner? or Mrs. Borden?

A. Mrs. Borden put the dishes out in the kitchen from the dining room.

Q. You washed them?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you go out that afternoon?

A. No, sir.

Q. Where did you remain on the afternoon of Wednesday after Mr. Morse came?

A. I guess I was ironing until four or half past four o'clock in the kitchen.

Q. What day had you done your washing that week? A. Monday.

Q. What day had you done the drying of your clothes? A. Monday, if it was pleasant.

Q. I mean this particular week.

A. Monday was the regular washing day.

Q. Did you wash on Monday, the week of Mr. Borden's death?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you dry your clothes Monday?

A. No, sir.

Q. On what A. Tuesday. day did you dry your clothes?

Q. Where did you do your washing?

A. Down cellar.

Q. In that part of the cellar known as the wash room?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Is there any other faucet down stairs except the faucet in the sink of the wash room?

A. No, sir, not that I know of.

Q. When you did do your washing on that week, how was the door leading out into the back yard from the cellar, --- open or closed?

A. It was open while I was down there.

Q. How was it on the day on which you did your drying, Tuesday? Was the door opened or closed?

A. It was closed.

Q. Who had locked that door after you got through washing and taking in your clothes?

A. I locked the door as I hung out the last of my clothes all the time.

Q. How did you lock that door?

A. A bolt.

Q. A bolt on which side of the door?

A. The inside.

Q. Now from that time, which was Tuesday, was it Tuesday you locked it or Monday?

A. Tuesday.

Q. From that time did you have occasion to go down into the cellar and washroom from time to time?

A. I went down but not through that door.

Q. I mean down from the inside of the house?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you notice any change in that door down to and after the time of the death of Mr. and Mrs. Borden?

A. No, sir, I did not.

Q. So far as you know it had remained bolted?

A. So far as I know I did not see any change in it.

Q. Before going again to Wednesday, I will ask you to describe the character of the travel on Second Street, as far as you can: Were there few people or many people who passed up and down that street?

A. On Wednesday?

Q. No, I mean generally.

A. I could not say. There was traffic more or less, --- folks, carriages and teams.

Q. Did you go to your room at all on the Wednesday afternoon after you finished your ironing?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. About what time did you go up to the room then?

A. I should say quarter to five or half past four; I cannot tell.

Q. What time did you come down again?

A. About half past five as far as I remember. I cannot exactly tell.

Q. Do you remember how you left the screen door when you went up?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. How was it?

A. The screen door was hooked.

Q. The hook was inside, I believe?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you get supper on the Wednesday night?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Passing back a moment, did you notice anything -- don't tell me what anyone said -- about Mr. Borden's and Mrs. Borden's condition of health on Wednesday morning?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. What did it appear to be?

A. Sick.

Q. Did you go out on Wednesday night?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Had you been there through Wednesday?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Were you sick at all that week before Thursday morning?

A. No, sir, I don't remember that I was.

Q. What was your condition on Tuesday night, the night preceding your description of Mr. and Mrs. Borden?

A. I was feeling pretty well in the morning and I got up with a headache.

Q. Which morning?

A. Thursday morning.

Q. I am speaking of Tuesday night. You passed a good night, did you?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you have any occasion after the dinner hour on Wednesday to go into the front part of the house?

A. No, sir.

Q. To do any work of any kind?

A. No, sir, I went to the front door on Wednesday.

Q. What was the occasion of going to the front door on Wednesday?

A. I let Dr. Bowen in.

Q. Was that in the morning or afternoon?

A. It was in the morning.

Q. Did you go to the door again on Wednesday after you let Dr. Bowen in?

A. No, sir.

Q. How was the door when you let Dr. Bowen in on Wednesday?

A. The spring lock had the key in it.

Q. Sprung locked, was it?

A. Yes.

Q. Did you say you had no occasion to go to that door again on that day?

A. No, sir.

Q. I was about to ask you where you passed Wednesday evening?

A. I was up in my friend's in Third Street.

Q. Was it far away from the house?

A. No, sir, not far.

Q. What time did you go and what time did you return on the Wednesday evening?

A. I guess I got out about 7 o'clock on Wednesday evening and I went down Second Street, called for a friend of mine on Third Street: we went down Main Street and up Morgan street and turned up Third Street to my friend's on Third Street.

Q. If you can tell me about what time you got home, I would like to have you?

A. I think about five minutes past ten.

Q. When you got home was there any light in the house?

A. The lamp was in the kitchen.

Q. The lamp waiting you?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you light it?

A. No, sir, it was lighted. It was always left lighted when I was out.

Q. Was there any light in the sitting room, dining room or either of the chambers that you saw?

A. No, sir, I did not see any light in any part of the house.

Q. When you went out on Wednesday evening, how did you leave the back door? A. Sprung locked.

Q. The wooden door, was that shut?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you have a key?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. When you came back how did you find the door?

A. It was locked.

Q. You unlocked it, I take it?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. With your key?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did anyone else have a key to the back door?

A. I think Mrs. Borden had a key to it.

Q. After you passed in through that door did you notice anything as to how it was locked, --- whether locked or otherwise?

A. I locked it myself with three locks as I came in.

Q. How did you lock it after you came in?

A. There was a lock, a spring lock, a bolt and spring. There were two spring locks and a bolt.

Q. In what condition were all those locks left on the Wednesday night when you last came in?

A. Well, I hooked the screen door. I came in and locked the wooden door, and sprung the latch, and a catch which couldn't be opened from the outside with any key, and then bolted the other lock.

Q. And you say you hooked the screen door in addition?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you go directly to bed?

A. Yes, sir; I went and took the lamp off of the table and went to the ice chest and took a glass of milk. That was all.

Q. Just before you went to bed?

A. Yes, sir; that was all I did; I went upstairs.

Q. What milk was it that you took?

A. Well, I guess it was the milk we had that day.

Q. The Wednesday's milk?

A.. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you use milk every day?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. From time to time. What time in the morning did the milkman come, if he came in the morning?

A. I couldn't tell. The milk was always left. I guess probably five or half past five; I can't tell.

Q. Before you got up?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And how was it left?

A. Left in the can outside the door.

Q. The night before what did you do about the can?

A. I put the can out the night before on the doorstep.

Q. That is, you washed the can yourself?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And put it out?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And then in the morning was that same can filled?

A. No, that can was taken and there was another can left.

Q. There was an exchange each morning?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You had two cans?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. One of which was with the milkman all the time and the other at home?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now in the course of that night did anything occur to you, should you say, in any way?

A. No, sir.

Q. In the morning did you feel anything different from ordinary?

A. Yes, sir; I felt kind of a dull headache as I got up in the morning.

Q. During the night did anything of any kind attract your attention?

A. No sir; not at all.

Q. No noise on the part of any one?

A. No, sir.

Q. What time did you get up on the Thursday morning?

A. Quarter past six.

Q. You came down your back stairs, of course?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Which are not carpeted -- the upper part?

A. The upper part ain't.

Q. That is, from the second to the third story there is no carpet on it?

A. No, sir.

Q. But from the second story to the kitchen entry there is a carpet on the stairs?
A. Yes, sir. There is from the hall leading from Mr. Borden's to the first story stairs, there is a carpet in there down to the lower floor.

Q. And the only thing on the route up to your room that is un carpeted is the stairs?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. That lead directly to the attic?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you have any timepiece in your room?

A. Yes, sir; I had a clock.

Q. What sort of a clock was it?

A. One of them little round clocks.

Q. Those little round tin ones, or metal ones?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you look to see what time it was when you got up that morning or not?

A. I looked when I came down to the kitchen.

Q. Is there a clock there?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Do you mean that is the clock you looked at?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. What time was it when you came down to the kitchen?

A. Thursday morning?

Q. Yes.

A. Quarter past six.

Q. Where did you first go after you came down to the kitchen?

A. Down cellar.

Q. What did you do down cellar?

A. I brought up some wood, started my fire, and went down and got some coal.

Q. And you brought that up in what, the coal hod?

A. The coal hod.

Q. You went down what way to the cellar?

A. Down the back stairs.

Q. Not the stairs leading out to the back yard, but the stairs inside the house?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you have occasion to go into or go by the back part of the cellar, the wash room part?

A. No.

Q. Or through it?

A. Yes, sir. The door was open there. I went down into the wood room.

Q. Which door do you speak of as being open?

A. The door from the wash room into the other cellar was wide open all the time.

Q. Did you come within observation of the door leading from the wash room out of doors?

A. No, sir.

Q. After you had got your wood and coal and started your fire, what is the next thing that you did?

A. I unlocked my door and took in the milk and put a pan out for the ice man and a pitcher with some water in it.

Q. When you came to the door to get your milk how did you find the locks compared with the condition you left them in the preceding night?

A. Just the same way as I left them.

Q. After you had unlocked the door, taken in your milk and put out your pan for the ice, how did you leave the back door then?

A. I hooked the screen door.

Q. That is, the panel door was left open, was it?
A. Yes, sir.

Q. And so far as you know was the panel door closed again that day down to the time and after the time of the deaths of Mr. and Mrs. Borden?

A. The wooden door?

Q. The wooden door.
A. No, sir.

Q. When you unlocked the wooden door and left it open, did you do anything to the screen door after you went in?

A. Only hooked.

Q. Now do you recall doing anything else before any one came down stairs?

A. No, sir; excepting my work around the kitchen generally, getting the breakfast;
and I had clothes on the clothes horse; I suppose I took them down, as I generally did.

Q. Did you go into any other room before any one else came down stairs?

A. The dining room.

Q. Did you have occasion to go into the sitting room or any other room?

A. No, sir.

Q. Just those two rooms?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Upon this morning what was the condition of the door between the dining room and the sitting room, open or shut -- during the morning I mean?

A. Shut.

Q. I do not mean when you first came down, but during the morning, if you know? A. Well, as far as I remember it was closed; I don't remember to see it open.

Q. The door between the dining room and the sitting room? A. Between the sitting room and dining room?

Q. Yes.

A. Well, that was always open.

Q. And what door did you have in mind when you said it was always closed?

A. The door leading from the kitchen to the sitting room.

Q. Who first appeared on the morning of Thursday? A. Mrs. Borden, I see, the first person.

Q. Where did you first see her when she came?

A. I was in the kitchen, and she came through the back entry, down stairs from her bedroom.

Q. Keep your voice up a little; you are lowering it.

A. She came down stairs from her bedroom, and I was in the kitchen.

Q. Did she go out of the house at all before breakfast?

A. No, sir; I did not see her.

Q. What did she begin to do or where did she go after she came down stairs?

A. She came down stairs that morning; she told me ----

Q. Perhaps what she told you I will not ask you. Where did she go?

A. She went in the sitting room.

Q. Now did you receive any directions about the breakfast from her?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. I don't care what they were. Did you notice whether she went into any other room than the sitting room?

A. No, sir, not that time.

Q. Did you begin to make preparations for the breakfast mean by way of selecting the food for breakfast, -- before or after you saw Mrs. Borden?

A. After she came down.

Q. After she came down and gave the directions?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Who next appeared?

A. Mr. Borden.

Q. And in what way did he appear: I mean from what stairway?

A. He came down the back stairway from his bedroom.

Q. Let me ask you if you have ever known of any communication on the second story between the front and the back part of the house? Is there any way to go that is ever used, to your knowledge?

A. Well, there was a door leading from Mrs. Borden's room into the front part of the house.

Q. And how was that door kept?

A. I couldn't tell you anything about it.

Q. You know nothing about it?

A. No, sir.

Q. Have you ever known people to go to the front part by way of the back stairs, or to the back part by way of the front stairs?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. When?

A. Once in a while I used to see the girls, Miss Lizzie and Miss Emma, coming down the back stairs.

Q. So they must have gone through, of course, in order to have done that?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now what time do you think it was when Mrs. Borden came down stairs?

A. Well, it might be twenty minutes of seven or half past six: I can't tell the time, for I never noticed it.

Q. How long after Mrs. Borden came down was it before Mr. Borden came?

A. Well, no more than five minutes, I don't think.

Q. What did he do when he came down stairs?

A. He came down stairs; he went into the sitting room and put a key on the shelf in the sitting room.

Q. What key was it he put on the shelf in the sitting room?

A. The key of his bedroom door.

Q. Where did he ordinarily keep that?

A. In the sitting room.

Q. On the shelf

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you notice what he did after he brought his key down and put it there?
A. He came out into the kitchen; he put a dressing coat on, as far as I think, and went outdoors.

Q. Did he bring anything else down stairs besides his key?

A. Yes, sir; a slop pail.

Q. What did he do with that?

A. Took it out doors.

Q. At the time you have just spoken of?

A. After putting his key back.

Q. Did you notice him when he went out of the screen door?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you notice whether at that time the screen door was locked or unlocked?

A. It was unlocked when he was out doors.

Q. I mean when he went out, when he came to the door?

A. It was locked.

Q. While he was out doors where did you remain?

A. In the kitchen.

Q. And the windows of the kitchen look out into the back yard, I believe?

A. Yes, sir, one of them.

Q. Now perhaps you can tell us what he did when he went out with his slop pail?

A. He emptied it, and unlocked the barn and went into the barn.

Q. What door of the barn did he unlock?

A. The large door leading out in the yard.

Q. You do not mean the front door, the carriage door?

A. No, sir.

Q. But the door which is just this side of the privy door?

A. Yes, sir. (Photograph shown witness). Yes, sir, the door where the water is, -- the water inside the door.
(At this point the noon recess was taken, from one o'clock until quarter past two)

DIRECT EXAMINATION OF BRIDGET SULLIVAN RESUMED.

Q. (By Mr. Moody) At the time of the adjournment you had told us about Mr. Borden's going into the backyard and unlocking the barn door?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Did he do anything else out in the yard besides unlock the door and empty the slops?

A. Yes sir. He brought in a basket of pears that he picked off the ground, and brought them in.

Q. From the back yard where did he go to?

A. Well, he went to the yard where the pear trees was.

Q. Well, I mean after he had picked the pears, what did he do?

A. He brought them in the kitchen and left them on the table there.

Q. Did you notice how he left the door after he came in?

A. Yes. He left it open.

Q. Did you remain in the kitchen?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Did you do anything to the door at that time after Mr. Borden came in?

A. I don't remember doing anything to the door.

Q. Perhaps I misled you. I mean when he came in through the screen door did he do anything to that?

A. I don't know. I can't say whether he hooked it or not.

Q. You don't know whether he did or not?

A. No sir.

Q. After he put the pears down in the kitchen what did he do or where did he go?

A. He washed up in the kitchen and got ready for breakfast.

Q. Do you know where he then went after he had completed his washing?

A. Breakfast.

Q. To breakfast?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Up to that time had you seen anyone besides Mr. and Mrs. Borden, up to the time when Mr. Borden went in to his breakfast?

A. No sir, not until I put the breakfast on the table and Mr. Morse sat down to breakfast.

Q. Where he had been up to that time, of course, you can't tell?

A. No sir.

Q. Had he been in the kitchen at all where you were?

A. I don't remember to see him.

Q. Now, will you tell us what there was for breakfast that morning?

A. There was some mutton, some broth and johnny cakes, coffee and cookies.

Q. The broth was made of what?

A. Mutton.

Q. It was mutton broth and meat itself, mutton?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Do you recall anything else that there was for breakfast?

A. No sir. I don't remember anything else.

Q. Do you remember whether there was any fruit or not in the dining-room?

A. No sir. I don't remember. I didn't put them on.

Q. What time about was it when they sat down to breakfast?

A. Well, it might be quarter past. I can't exactly tell the time.

Q. Do you have any idea of how long they were at their breakfast?

A. No sir. I have not.

Q. What were you doing while breakfast was going on?

A. I was around the kitchen cleaning up things, etc., I don't know exactly what I was doing.

Q. Had your ironing been completed the day before?

A. Yes sir.

Q. And the clothes put away?

A. Yes sir.

Q. You spoke of their being at breakfast. Who was at the breakfast?

A. Mr. Borden, Mrs. Borden and Mr. Morse.

Q. After the breakfast was completed do you know where those three went or either of them?

A. Well, I guess they must go in the sitting-room. The bell rang, and when I went in there was nobody in the dining-room.

Q. The bell from the table, do you mean?

A.. Yes sir.

Q. Indicating that the breakfast had been completed?

A. Yes sir.

Q. And they had gone from the dining-room at that time?

A. Yes sir.

Q. What did you do then?

A. I sat down and had my breakfast.

Q. Did you have your breakfast in the dining-room?

A. Yes sir.

Q. After you had completed your breakfast what did you do?

A. I cleared off the dishes, etc., and commenced to wash them.

Q. Now during that time were you in any other room except the kitchen and dining- room?

A. No sir, except going in the kitchen closet to put the things away, and so forth. Of course I had to go there, and the ice chest.

Q. The closet you speak of is the closet that leads right out of the kitchen?

A. Yes sir.

Q. The door opens from the kitchen itself?

A. Yes sir.

Q. After you had completed your breakfast what did you do?

A. I took the dishes off out of the dining-room and brought them out in the kitchen and began to wash them.

Q. Did you complete the washing of the dishes before any one else appeared?

A. No sir.

Q. Who next appeared?

A. The next I remember to see was Mr. Borden and Mr. Morse going out the back entry -- the back door.

Q. Did Mr. Morse return after the two went out to the screen door? A. No sir, he went out.

Q. Did Mr. Borden return at that time?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Were you in a position to see how Mr. Borden left the door after he let Mr. Morse out?

A. No sir, I couldn't tell how he left the door.

Q. While you were eating your breakfast in the dining-room how was the door between the dining-room and the kitchen?

A. Opened.

Q. When Mr. Borden returned from letting Mr. Morse out where did he go, where did Mr. Borden go?

A. He came to the sink, and he cleaned his teeth in the sink, and after that he took a bowl, a big bowl, and filled it with water and took it up to his room.

Q. Up to that time had any one else appeared, up to the time that Mr. Borden went up into his room?

A. I don't remember to see anybody.

Q. Do you know whether he took the key or not as he went up with the pitcher?

A. Yes sir, he had the key in his hand.

Q. Did you see where the key came from?

A. He took it off of the shelf in the sitting-room.

Q. After Mr. Borden went upstairs did you continue to remain in the kitchen until some one else came, or did you go away?

A. No sir, I was washing the dishes at the sink, and Miss Lizzie came through.

Q. About how long was it after Mr. Morse went that Miss Lizzie Borden came?

A. I don't know how long it was. It was no more than five minutes, I don't think. I don't remember how the time was.

Q. When she came, into which room did she come? Where did you first see her?

A. The kitchen.

Q. From what room did she come?

A. From the sitting-room.

Q. What did she do?

A. She came through the kitchen and she left down the slop pail, and I asked her what did she want for breakfast. She said she didn't know as she wanted any breakfast, but she guessed she would have something, she would have some coffee and cookies.

Q. (By Mr. Robinson) What did you say?

A. I asked her what did she want for her breakfast. She said she didn't want any breakfast but she felt as if she should have something, she guessed she would have some coffee and cookies.

Q. (By Mr. Moody) And what did she do after she said that?
A. She got some coffee, got her cup and saucer and got some coffee; and I went out in the back yard, and she was getting her own breakfast.

Q. Had she sat down before you went out to the back yard?

A. Yes sir, she was preparing sitting down at the kitchen table.

Q. When you went out in the back yard had Mr. Borden come down again?

A. No sir, I didn't see him.

Q. When you went out in the back yard how did you find the screen door?

A. It was hooked.

Q. Of course you unhooked it and went out?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Leaving Miss Lizzie Borden in the kitchen?

A. Yes sir.

Q. What was the occasion of your going out that morning? A. I had a sick headache and I was sick to my stomach.

Q. And did you go out to vomit? A. Yes sir.

Q. Where did you go to? A. I was in the back yard.

Q. Right in the yard, do you mean? A. Yes sir.

Q. How long do you think you stayed out there, if you can give us any judgment of the time?

A. Well, I can't tell how long I was out there. I may be ten minutes, I may be fifteen; I can't tell exactly the time.

Q. Perhaps I can help you. Did you do anything out there except to accomplish the purpose for which you went out?

A. No sir, I didn't.

Q. When you had completed that where did you go? A. I came in the kitchen.

Q. As you returned to the kitchen did you do anything with reference to the screen door?

A. Yes sir, I hooked it as I came in from the back yard.

Q. As you returned to the kitchen, who, if anyone, was there? A. I didn't see anybody.

Q. Did you see Mr. Borden again?

A. No sir.

Q. Did you see Mr. Borden again before you saw him at the front door later on in the morning?

A. No sir, I didn't see Mr. Borden since I think he went up to his room with the water until I left him in the front door.

Q. Where he had gone in the meantime you do not know?

A. No sir, I do not.

MR. ROBINSON -- I can't hear her now.

The WITNESS -- No sir, I don't know where he went to.

Q. So the last time you saw him was when he went upstairs with his pitcher and his key?

A. Yes sir, that is the last I remember of.

Q. That was before Miss Lizzie came down?

A. Yes sir.

Q. What did you go to doing when you came back into the kitchen?

A. I completed washing my dishes. Some of them was washed, and all of them wasn't, and I finished them and took them in the dining-room, and I got them completed, and Mrs. Borden was there.

Q. You will have to speak a little louder.

A. Mrs. Borden was in the dining-room as I was fixing my dining-room table, and she asked me if I had anything to do this morning. I said, No, not particular, if she had anything to do for me. She said she wanted the windows washed. I asked her how, and she said "inside and outside both, they are awful dirty."

Q. What was she doing when you had that talk with her in the dining-room?


A. She was dusting. She had a feather duster in her hand. She was dusting between the sitting-room and dining-room, the door.

Q. Do you recall whether she had any covering over her hair at that time? A. No sir, I don't think she did.

Q. When after that did you see Mrs. Borden?

A. I don't remember to see her; I don't remember to see Mrs. Borden before since she came down into the kitchen.

Q. I don't think I made myself clear to you. You have told us that in the dining-room, after you had finished your dishes, that she gave you some directions about washing the windows?

A. Yes sir.

Q. And that at that time she was dusting between the dining-room and sitting-room?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Now I ask you when next after that event did you see Mrs. Borden alive?

A. I didn't see her any more until I found her dead upstairs.

Q. At that time did you see Miss Lizzie Borden anywhere?

A. No sir.

Q. At the time you received this direction?

A. No sir, I don't remember to see her.

Q. Are you able to fix the time or about the time when you received this direction from Mrs. Borden the last time you saw her alive?

A. Well, I can't exactly tell the time, but I think it was about nine o'clock.

Q. How long was it after Miss Lizzie Borden had come down stairs that you saw Mrs. Borden dusting between the two rooms?

A. I don't know; it might be fifteen minutes. I can't tell the time, what time it was. I never noticed the clock, although there was enough of them around.

Q. Well, that answers it. After you received this direction from her where did you go and what did you begin to do?

A. I was out in the kitchen.

Q. What were you doing in the kitchen?

A. Oh, I was cleaning off my stove and putting things in their places, and so forth, and when I got ready I went in the dining-room and sitting-room and left down the windows which I was going to wash, and went down cellar and got a pail for to take some water.

Q. Then you say you went in the dining-room and sitting-room and left down the windows?

A. Yes.

Q. And what did you do to them, exactly?

A. Well, the windows was up, and I left down the windows.

Q. Shut them up?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Did you shut the windows in both rooms?

A. Yes sir, there was a window up in both the rooms.

Q. Were the curtains up or down in the rooms?

A. There was no curtains there.

Q. Were the shutters closed or open?

A. They was open at the bottom, I remember.

Q. Did you change their position at the time you shut the windows -- the position of the shutters?

A. No sir, I don't think I did.

Q. Up to the time when you shut the windows on the outside in those two rooms had you in any way closed the shutters of the dining-room and the sitting-room?

A. No sir, I don't think I did.

Q. When you went in the dining-room and the sitting-room to close the windows did you see Miss Lizzie Borden there at all?

A. No sir, I didn't see anybody.

Q. From there you say you went down cellar?

A. Yes sir.

Q. What did you get down cellar?

A. A wooden pail.

Q. Where did you then go?

A. I came upstairs. In the kitchen closet I found a brush which was to wash the windows with. I filled my pail with water in the sink and took it out doors. As I was outside the back door Lizzie Borden appeared in the back entry, and says,"Maggie, are you going to wash the windows?" I says, "Yes." I said, "You needn't lock the door; I will be out around here; but you can lock it if you want to; I can get the water in the barn."

Q. Did she make any reply to that?

A. I don't know, sir, she didn't.

Q. Now had you seen her between the time you left her in the kitchen eating her breakfast and the time she appeared at the screen door as you went out with your pail of water and brush?

A. I don't remember to see her.

Q. Do you know what she did to the door?

A. She didn't hook it.

Q. Do you know where she then went as you went out doors?

A. No sir, I do not.

Q. You have said that, going out with your pail and your brush, you went to the barn?

A. I went to the barn to get the handle for the brush.

Q. Where was that in the barn?

A. It was in the barn right in one of the stalls.

Q. On, of course, the first floor of the barn?

A. Yes sir.

Q. What did you then do?

A. I went washing the dining-room windows.

Q. Did you wash the dining-room windows first?

A. No sir; I washed the sitting-room windows first.

Q. And the sitting-room windows, were, I believe, on the south side of the house -- the Kelly side?

A. Yes sir.

Q. And on the side away from the screen door?

A. Yes sir.

Q. While you were washing those windows did you see the girl who worked in the Kelly house?

A. Before I started to wash the windows, as I had the water and brush, Mrs. Kelly's girl appeared, and I was talking to her at the fence.

Q. How did you wash these windows, if you will be kind enough to tell us? A. I washed them with the brush and water.

Q. That is, using a pail?

A. Yes sir.

Q. And a long-handled brush?

A. Yes sir.

Q. After you had washed the windows on the south side of the house, the sitting-room windows, in the way you have told, what did you next do?

A. The parlor windows.

Q. While you were washing the sitting-room windows did you see anyone in the sitting-room?

A. No sir, I don't remember to see anybody.

Q. How many windows on the front of the house, of the parlor windows, did you wash?

A. Two.

Q. That is all there were?

A. There is three windows in the parlor, but there are two in the front.

Q. Had you been into the parlor to do anything that morning?

A. No, sir.

Q. Were the blinds of the parlor open or closed?

A. Closed.

Q. To wash them of course you had to open the blinds?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Were the shutters in the parlor opened or closed?

A. There was curtains for the inside of the parlor.

Q. And these curtains, were how? A. I don't remember how they were.

Q. You don't remember whether the curtains were up or down?

A. No sir, I do not.

Q. After you had washed the two front windows, where did you go?

A. Between times I went to the barn and got some water. I washed the dining-room windows, one side parlor window, one window on the side of the house, the dining- room.

Q. Now where did you get your water from in washing these seven windows? A. In the barn, except the first pail I brought from the kitchen.

Q. How many times during the time you were washing the sitting-room windows on the south side of the house did you go round to the barn to get your water?

A. I could not tell how many times.

Q. Can you give us any idea?
A. No sir, I went there to get water -- I must go there twice anyway to get water to wash them the first time.

Q. Washing the first two windows I am speaking of now?

A. Yes sir.

Q. In going to the barn to get your water, how did you go? Did you go round the front of the house or round the rear of the house?

A. I went round the rear of the house when I was on that side and when I was in the front I went beside the back door.

Q. That is, when washing that front part windows you went by the screen door?

A. Yes sir.

Q. But when washing the sitting-room windows you did not go by the screen door?

A. No sir.

Q. Can you tell us how many times you went to the barn for water while washing thetwo front windows?

A. I know I got six or seven pails, --- I can't tell the right number.

Q. Now during all that time did anyone come to the house, that you saw?

A. No sir, I did not see anybody.

Q. When you came to washing the dining-room windows did you see anyone inside the dining-room?

A. No sir.

Q. After you had completed washing your windows, what did you do?

A. I went after I completed them, -- with the brush I went and got a dipper in the kitchen.

Q. And found the screen door, of course, unlocked?

A. Yes sir, I went and took a dipper full of water and went to the barn and got some clean water and commenced to wash the sitting-room windows again by throwing water up on them.

Q. By taking the dipper and dashing the water up on them?

A. Yes sir.

Q. When you went into the kitchen to get your dipper, did you see anyone there?

A. No sir.

Q. Did you go into the kitchen more than once during the process of washing windows?

A. No sir.

Q. After you had dashed the sitting-room windows in the way you have described, did you do anything to the other windows?

A. Yes sir, I went right round.

Q. Doing the same thing?

A. Yes sir.

Q. When you had completed this rinsing of the windows, if I may call it that, what did you do?

A. I went into the kitchen. I put the handle of the brush away in the barn and brought the pail and dipper in and put the dipper behind and I got the hand basin and went into the sitting- room to wash the sitting-room windows.

Q. Did you go to the barn to put away the handle of the brush before you went in, or after?

A. Before I went in.

Q. Before you went in?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Now I think you said you took the basin in there?

A. Yes sir, a hand dish in the sink.

Q. What else did you take?

A. A step-ladder in the kitchen.

Q. Anything else?

A. No sir, except a cloth I had to wash with.

Q. When you came into the kitchen after having put your brush handle in the barn, did you do anything to the screen door?

A. I hooked it.

Q. After you had got your washing materials into which room did you first go?

A. The sitting-room.

Q. I may ask you if you washed the inside of the parlor windows?

A. No sir.

Q. You did not go into the parlor, as I understand it?

A. No sir, I did not.

Q. Which window did you begin to wash in the inside?

A. The next window to the front door.

Q. In which room?

A. In the sitting-room.

Q. How much had you done of that work before you heard something? A. I had the upper part of the window done.

Q. Done?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Had you seen anyone up to that time since you saw Lizzie at the screen door?

A. No sir, not that I remember.

Q. Will you describe what you heard which attracted your attention?

A. Well, I heard like a person at the door was trying to unlock the door and push it but could not, so I went to the front door and unlocked it.

Q. Did you hear the ringing of any bell?

A. No sir, I don't remember to hear any bell.

Q. When you got to the front door what did you find the condition of the locks there? A. I went to open it, caught it by the knob, the spring lock, as usual, and it was locked. I unbolted it and it was locked with a key. Q. So that there were three locks?

A. Yes sir.

Q. What did you do with reference to the lock with the key?

A. I unlocked it. As I unlocked it I said, "Oh pshaw," and Miss Lizzie laughed, up stairs. -- Her father was out there on the door step. She was up stairs.

Q. Up stairs; could you tell whereabouts up stairs she was when she laughed?

A. Well, she must be either in the entry or in the top of the stairs, I can't tell which.

Q. Was there any talk passed between you and Mr. Borden as he came to the door?

A. No sir, not a word.

Q. I am reminded that one question was unanswered. How many locks on the front door were unlocked as you went there, -- locks and bolts, I mean?

A. There was a bolt and there was a spring lock, and there was a key.

Q. And those were all locked?

A. Yes sir.

Q. During the morning hours, usually, was that door kept locked otherwise than by the spring lock?

A. I don't know anything about the door; I didn't have nothing to do to it.

Q. After you had let Mr. Borden in, where did you go?

A. I went on washing my window.

Q. Into the sitting-room again?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Where did he go?

A. And he come into the sitting-room and went into the dining-room.

Q. Did you see whether he had anything or not?

A. He had a little parcel in his hand, same as a paper or a book; I can't tell what it was.

Q. Speak a little louder, please.

A. He had a parcel in his hand, the same as a paper or a book; I can't tell what it was.

Q. Did you see what Mr. Borden did when he went into the dining-room? A. He sat down in a chair at the head of the lounge.

Q. And what did you continue to do?

A. I was washing my windows. I went out into the kitchen after something; I see the man sitting on the lounge, and the chair at the head of the lounge.

Q. In the dining-room?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Did any one else appear at that time?

A. Miss Lizzie came down stairs, probably five minutes couldn't tell exactly the time; she came down through the entry, the front entry, into the dining-room, I suppose to her father.

Q. And in going to the dining-room did she have to go through the sitting-room in which you were?

A. Yes sir.

Q. What did she say, if anything, to her father?

A. I heard her ask her father if he had any mail, and they had some talk between them which I didn't understand or pay any attention to, but I heard her tell her father that Mrs. Borden had a note and gone out.

Q. What is the next thing that happened?

A. The next thing I remember, Mr. Borden went out in the kitchen and come in the kitchen door, come from the kitchen into the sitting-room and took a key off the mantel piece and went up stairs to his room.

Q. What key was it that he took?

A. The key of his bedroom door.

Q. And what stairs did he go up?

A. The back stairs.

Q. What is the next thing that you did?

A. Well, as Mr. Borden come down stairs, I was completed in the sitting-room, and taking my water and taking the hand basin and step ladder into the dining-room. As I got in there he pulled a rocking chair and sat down in the rocking chair near the window and let down the window, as I left it up when I got through.

Q. Sat in a rocking chair in which room?

A. The sitting-room.

Q. As he sat down in the sitting-room, what did you begin to do? A. I began to wash the dining-room windows.

Q. At the time that he came down and you were passing from the sitting-room to the dining-room, was Miss Lizzie Borden there then?

A. I don't remember to see her.

Q. You began washing your two windows in the dining-room, did you?

A. Yes sir.

Q. While you were washing those windows did any one appear in the dining-room?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Who was it? A Miss Lizzie.

 Q. From what room did she appear? Through what door did she appear? She came in from the sitting-room into the dining-room.
Will you state what she did after she came in?

A. She came into the dining-room, went out in the kitchen and took an ironing board and placed it on the dining-room table and commenced to iron.

Q. You in the meantime washing the windows?

A. I was washing the last window in the dining-room.

Q. Did she say anything to you, or you to her, while you were doing that, and she was doing what you describe?

A. She said, "Maggie, are you going out this afternoon?" I said, "I don't know; I might and I might not; I don't feel very well." She says, "If you go out, be sure and lock the door, for Mrs. Borden has gone out on a sick call, and I might go out, too." Says I, "Miss Lizzie, who is sick?" "I don't know; she had a note this morning; it must be in town."

Q. Did you complete the washing of your two windows in the dining-room?

A. Yes sir. I washed them before I got through with them.

Q. And in the meantime did she go on ironing whatever she was ironing?

A. Yes sir, she got through, and I went out in the kitchen.

Q. What was she ironing?

A. Handkerchiefs.

Q. And where were the flats that she was ironing with?

A. In the stove, in the kitchen.

Q. Do you know anything of the condition of the fire at that time?

A. No sir, I couldn't tell how it was.

Q. You say you finished your washing of the windows and went into the kitchen?

A. Yes sir.

Q. What did you do in the kitchen?

A. I washed out the cloths that I had washing the windows, and hung them behind the stove. As I got through, Miss Lizzie came out and said, "There is a cheap sale of dress goods at Sargent's this afternoon, at eight cents a yard." I don't know that
she said "this afternoon," but "today." And I said, "I am going to have one."

Q. What did you do then?

A, I went up stairs to my room.

Q. Up to that time, Miss Sullivan, had you seen or heard any other person about the premises except those whom you have named?

A. No sir, I don't remember to hear a sound of anybody else.

Q. What did you do when you got to your bedroom?

A. I went up stairs to my bedroom. When I got up in the bedroom I laid in the bed.

Q. When is the first occasion that you had to notice the time after you got up in your bedroom?

A. I heard the bells outdoors ring, the city hall bell, as I suppose it was, and I looked at my clock and it was eleven o'clock. My clock was in the room.

Q. Were you lying on the bed at that time?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Had you become drowsy at all, or anything of that sort? A. I don't remember; I know I wasn't drowsing or sleeping.

Q. Have you a judgment as to how long you were there between the time you reached your bed and the time that the city hall clock struck eleven?

A. Well, I might be there -- of course I can't tell, I didn't notice the time when I went to my room, but by my judgment I think I was there three or four minutes.

Q. Did you get drowsy at all up to the time you were called; didn't you go to sleep at all?

A. Why, I don't think I did.

Q. Up to the time when some one called you, did you hear any noise?

A. No sir, I don't remember to hear a sound of anybody.

Q. Did you hear any opening or closing of the screen door?

A. No sir, I did not.

Q. Are you able to hear the opening or closing of that screen door from your bedroom?

A. Yes sir, if anybody goes in or out and is careless and slams the door, I can hear it in my room.

Q. What is the next that occurred as you were lying upon the bed?

A. Miss Lizzie hollered, "Maggie, come down!" I said, "What is the matter?" She says, "Come down quick; father's dead, somebody come in and killed him."

Q. Can you give me a judgment of how long that was after the clock struck eleven?

A. Well, it might be ten or fifteen minutes, about as far as I can judge.

Q. You had a clock, as you have told us, in your room?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Did you look at the clock?

A. No sir, I did not.

Q. What did you do?

A. I run down stairs.

Q. Had you, by the way, changed any of your clothing?

A. No sir, I did not.

Q. Or taken off your shoes?

A. No sir.

Q. Or taken off any clothing at all?

A. No sir.

Q. What was the usual dress that Miss Lizzie Borden wore mornings? Will you describe it?

MR. ROBINSON. MR. MOODY.

Wait a moment; we object to that. Not as having any tendency to show what she had on that morning.

I object.
I don't care to press it against objection. Well, she wore a ----

  MR. ROBINSON and MR. MOODY. Wait a moment.

Q. I will call your attention, not asking you when it was worn or what part of the time it was worn, to a cotton or calico dress with light blue groundwork and a little figure. Does that bring to your mind the dress I am referring to?

A. No sir, it was not a calico dress she was in the habit of wearing.

Q. I did not ask you about the habit, but ----

MR. ROBINSON.
That should be stricken out.

Certainly.

Let it be stricken out.

Q. Do you remember a dress of such a color with a figure in it?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Will you describe that dress that I have referred to as well as you can?

A. It was a blue dress with a sprig on it.

Q. What was the color of the blue; what was the shade of the blue?

A. Light blue.

Q. And what was the color of what you have called the sprig on it?

A. It was a darker blue, I think, than what the under part was.

Q. Did it have any light spots or light, figures in it?
MR. ROBINSON. This is very leading now ----

A. I don't remember.

MR. ROBINSON. I would like to have the witness describe the dress; she is competent to do that. Was the last question answered? (Question read). "I don't remember."

MR. ROBINSON.
I move that that be stricken out.

MR. KNOWLTON.
I object. I contend that the question is not leading.

MR. ROBINSON.
I understand he does not propose to go any further with it.

MR. MOODY.
I do not.

MR. KNOWLTON.
That is all, -- to negative the fact of a white figure in it.

MR. ROBINSON.
Well, we will have no talk about it, now. Let it stand as it is.

Q. When did she procure that dress?

A. Last spring, I guess.

Q. Do you know who made it?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Who? (Witness hesitated). If you do not know of your own knowledge, I won't ask you.

A. I know her, but I forget the lady's name.

Q. It is the name that you are hesitating about, is it?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Do you know where her place of business is?

A. No sir, I do not.

Q. Was it made at the house or made somewhere else?

A. I think it was made at the house.

Q. Was it a dressmaker that she usually had, or some other dressmaker?

A. Why, generally the same dressmaker has been there ever since I have been in the house.

Q. The same dressmaker that has always been there?

A. Yes sir.

Q. The same one that was always there made this dress that you describe?

A. I can't tell who made the dress at all, but I know the dressmaker was there in the house dressmaking that spring.

Q. And she got that dress that spring?

A. I can't tell who made it.

MR. MOODY.
Yes, I understand. There is a dress, your Honors, which is not here at the present time, that we intended to show to the witness. I would like to reserve the privilege of doing so. It is here, but it is under lock and key.

MR. KNOWLTON.
Professor Wood has the key with which it is locked up, and he is absent.

Q.. When you heard this outcry, did you go down stairs?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Whom did you first see when you came down stairs?

A. Miss Lizzie.

Q. Let me ask you in this connection if you are able to tell us what dress she had on that morning?

A. No sir, I couldn't tell what dress the girl had on.

Q. And you couldn't describe it?

A. No sir, I couldn't.

Q. Where was Miss Lizzie standing as you came down the back stairs?

A. Standing at the back door, standing at the door that leads in, a wooden door.

Q. Was the door open or closed?

A The door was open.

Q. Was she in or outside or upon the threshold?

A. She was inside the threshold, as far as I can remember.

Q. You spoke of her standing with her back towards something. What was her back towards?

A. Standing with her back to the screen door. I don't know as she leaned against the door or not.

Q. When you said the door was open, you meant the screen door, I suppose? A. No sir. I meant the wooden door. The screen door was shut.

Q. Could you tell whether it was hooked as well as shut?

A. No sir, I couldn't tell whether it was hooked or not.

Q. Did you say anything to her at that time or she to you?

A. I went around to go right in the sitting-room and she says, "Oh, Maggie, don't go in. I have got to have a doctor quick. Go over. I have got to have the doctor." So I went over to Dr. Bowen's right away, and when I came back I says, "Miss Lizzie, where was you?" I says, "Didn't I leave the screen door hooked?" She says, "I was out in the back yard and heard a groan, and came in and the screen door was wide open."

Q. Did you have anything more said between you at that time?

A. No sir, not at that time. She wanted to know if I knew where Miss Russell lived, and I says, "Yes." She says, "Go and get her. I can't be alone in the house." So I stepped inside the entry and got a hat and shawl that was hanging inside the entry and went down to Miss Russell.

Q. Had there any outcry or alarm been given at that time to the neighbors?

A. No sir.

Q. Where did you first go to get Miss Russell?

A. I went in the corner house, the corner of Second and Borden street.

Q. It is suggested you didn't tell us whether you found Dr. Bowen or not.

A. No sir, I did not. His wife came to the door, and I told her that Mr. Borden was dead. I think that is what I told her, and she said the doctor wasn't in, but she expected him along any time, and she would send him over.

Q. Now, you were about describing to us the house where you first went to get Miss Russell?

A. I went in the house on the corner of Second and Borden street.

Q. Did you find any one there?|

A. I found a woman and asked her if----

Q. Never mind that. You teamed that Miss Russell was not there?

A. Yes, she was not there.

Q. Where did you go then?

A. I went out and on the corner I met a man which Mrs. Churchill sent, looking for a doctor, I guess and I asked him ---

Q. One moment. Please do not repeat that. Where did you go? You learned where Miss Russell lived from someone?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Where did you go?

A. She lived on Borden street.

Q. In the little cottage house next the baker shop?

A. Yes sir.

Q. How far did you go before you found her? A. I can't tell how long it was.

Q. Well, was Miss Russell there then?

A. Yes. I saw Miss Russell at the screen door as I came to the door. She appeared at the door, and I told her.

Q. She appeared at the door as you approached the door?

A. Yes sir.

Q. And after some conversation with her did you go away?

A. Yes sir. I went back home.

Q. Where did you go to?

A. I went to the house where I left.

Q. Now, going back a moment, in going over to Dr. Bowen's and returning, did you go rapidly or slowly or how?

A. I don't know. I guess I ran. I don't know whether I did or not, but I guess I went as fast as I could.

Q. When you returned to the house by what door did you enter?

A. The back door.

Q. The screen door, as we call it?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Who had got there then, if any one?

A. When I came from Miss Russell's?

Q. Yes.

A. Mrs. Churchill was in and Dr. Bowen.

Q. Was any one else there at that time except Mrs. Churchill and Dr. Bowen?

A. No sir, -- and Miss Lizzie.

Q. Where were they when you returned from your errand in seeking Miss Russell?

A. I think Miss Lizzie was in the kitchen with Mrs. Churchill and Mrs. Churchill and I went into the dining-room, and Dr. Bowen came out from the sitting-room and said,  "He is murdered; he is murdered."

Q. What happened then?

A. "Oh," I says, "Lizzie if I knew where Mrs. Whitehead was I would go and see if Mrs. Borden was there and tell her that Mr. Borden was very sick." She says, "Maggie, I am almost positive I heard her coming in. Won't you go up stairs to see." I said, "I am not going up stairs alone."

Q. Before that time that she said that had you been up stairs? A. No sir. I had been up stairs after sheets for Dr. Bowen.

Q. Into whose room?

A. Into Mrs. Borden's and into the little room where he kept the safe.

Q. What led you to go up stairs into Mrs. Borden's room? Describe all that was done and said.

A. Dr. Bowen wanted a sheet and I said "I guessed the sheets were up in Mrs. Borden's room, Mrs. Borden's desk where she kept the bed-clothes, and he wanted to get the keys, and I asked Dr. Bowen if he would get the keys off the shelf in the sitting-room, and he did so and Miss Russell said she would do anything to help me. She went in and unlocked the door and got two sheets, I guess.

Q. Was it Miss Russell or Mrs. Churchill? A. Mrs. Churchill.

Q. When you went up with the key from Dr. Bowen from the sitting-room, did you find the entrance to Mr. Borden's sleeping-room locked or unlocked?

A. Locked.

Q. When you returned with the sheets did you lock the door?

A. Yes sir.

Q. It was after that then that the conversation about going to Mrs. Whitehead's occurred?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Won't you state that again? I did not quite hear it. You said, "I says Lizzie, if I knew---" Now upon your return, what was said?

A. I said, "Miss Lizzie, if I knew where Mrs. Whitehead's was I would go and see if Mrs. Borden is there. She said, "Maggie, I am almost positive I heard her coming in," she said, "I am sure she is up stairs." I said, "I am not going up again."

Q. Who is Mrs. Whitehead?

A. Mrs. Borden's sister.

Q. Who lived in Fall River?

A. Yes sir.

Q. In consequence of what was said to you, what was said or done?

A. Mrs. Churchill said she would go with me. I went from the dining-room into the sitting-room and up stairs.

Q. Describe what you saw as you went up stairs?

A. As I went up stairs I saw the body under the bed. I ran right into the room and stood at the foot of the bed.

Q. How far up stairs did you go before you saw the body?
A. I don't remember how far, but I remember to see the woman's clothing.

Q. (By Mr. Robinson.) What?

A. I don't remember how far up I went. I guess I went far enough to see.

Q. (By Mr. Moody) The woman's clothing you were saying ---

A. Right between the bed and the wall, the bed was high enough to see, -- I went right into the room and stood at the foot of the bed.

Q. Was the door leading into that chamber where Mrs. Borden was found dead open or closed as you came up the stair-way?

A. Open.

Q. Do you recall anything about the curtains or shutters in that room at that time? A. No sir, I could not tell how they were.

Q. Can you tell anything about how light it was in that room at that time? A. No sir, I could not tell; I did not stay long enough to notice anything.

Q. Did you stop to make any examination of Mrs. Borden at that time to see what the matter was with her?

A. No sir, I did not.

Q. What did you then do? A. I came down stairs.

Q. Did Mrs. Churchill go into the room with you? A. No sir.

Q. When you came down stairs what occurred?

A. When I came down stairs Miss Lizzie was in the dining-room, lying on the lounge with Miss Russell.

Q. Can you tell anything else that was done or said before you came down after having found this second dead body?

A. No sir, I cannot say, but they asked if I would go over and tell Mrs. Bowen to come over. I went over and told Mrs. Bowen, rung the front door bell and told her that Mrs. Borden was dead and they wanted her to come over.

Q. That was another time that you went to Dr. Bowen's house?

A. Yes sir.

Q. After you found Mrs. Borden dead?

A. Yes sir.

Q. While you were speaking to Mrs. Bowen the second time you went to the house, did you see anyone else, did anyone else come there?

A. To Mrs. Bowen's?

Q. Yes, or the adjoining door.
A. Mr. Miller spoke to me and wanted to know what was the matter.

Q. I don't care what he said.

A. Mr. Miller spoke to me. That was all, I guess.

Q. Do you recall anything else that Miss Borden said to you with reference to her whereabouts after you went up stairs?

A. No sir, I do not remember.

Q. I don't know that you made it quite clear what Miss Lizzie Borden was doing as you went up stairs?

A. To my room, do you mean?

Q. Yes, to your own room.

A. She was in the dining-room, turned in, and as she went into the dining-room I went up stairs.

Q. Had she stopped ironing at that time?

A. No sir.

Q. Up to the time when Miss Lizzie Borden told her father and told you in reference to the note, had you heard anything about it from anyone?

A. No sir, I never did.

Q. Let me ask you if anyone to your knowledge came to that house on the morning of Aug. 4th with a message or a note for Mrs. Borden?

A. On that day?

Q. Yes.

A. No sir, I never seen nobody.

Q. Will you state again (Turning to Mr. Robinson) -- I would say that there is some difference of recollection between my associate and myself and I should like that statement repeated.

MR. ROBINSON. I think there is great objection to repeating testimony simply because counsel do not remember. The testimony may be read from the minutes. MR. MOODY. I will not ask the question.

Q. Have you stated all that she said to her father about Mrs. Borden's absence?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Do you recall whether anything was said about a note?

A. She told her father her mother had a note and had gone out.

MR. ROBINSON.
That has already been gone into.


MR. MOODY.
That is my recollection, but my associate --


MR. ROBINSON. 
It is my recollection that that has been gone into.

I ask then that the answer just given be stricken out.
 MASON, C.J.
The last answer may be stricken out.

Q. Was anything in that conversation with the father said about a sick person?

A. No sir, she had a note and gone out. I did not hear any more.

Q. I neglected to ask you whether Miss Emma Borden was absent? A. Yes sir.

Q. On the day of these homicides? A. Yes sir.

Q. How long had she been away?
A. I think she was two weeks; I cannot tell exactly.

Q. I suppose you only know from information where she was?

A. No sir, I did not know where she was.

Q. Did you see some officers about the premises that day after the murder, after the homicides?

A. Yes sir.

Q. Do you know which officers they were?
A. I know them now but I did not know them then.

Q. Do you know now which officers they were?
A. Officer Doherty was there and the Assistant Marshal and officer Medley, I guess.

Q. Anyone else that occurs to you?

A. I don't remember.

Q. Did you go into the front part or the rear part of the house with the officers?

A. No sir, I did not; I went up stairs to Mrs. Borden's room, up to my own room and to three other rooms in the first story.

Q. My question was, did you go up into the front part of the house at all with them?

A. Not with the officers.

Q. Had you ever seen a hatchet with a broken handle about the premises?

A. No sir, I did not see any hatchet. I had no occasion to any of them.

Q. A hatchet with the handle broken off close to the blade of the hatchet. Had you ever seen such a thing?

A. No sir, I did not.

Q. Who did the cutting of the wood?

A. The man on the farm.

Q. Do you remember what his name was?

A. His first name was Alfred; I don't know his last name.

Q. How often did he come to do it?

A. I think he cut it over on the farm and brought it over and split it small, some of it, down cellar.

Q. Did you have anything to do with that cutting or chopping of the wood at all?

A. No sir, I did not.

Q. You used it just as it was prepared for you?

A. Yes sir, I did.

Q. On the day before, on Wednesday, did you see Miss Lizzie Borden at any time during the day?

A. Yes sir, she Was down to her breakfast and down to her dinner.

Q. Did you see her between those times?

A. I don't remember. I know she was down before the dinner was put on the table Wednesday.

Q. Were you in the habit of tending the bell calls at the front door?

A. Yes sir, when Mr. Borden or Mrs. Borden was not at home, but when they were in the sitting-room I did not go to the door.

Q. At any time when you answered the bell call did you find the door locked in the way you described this morning?

MR. ROBINSON.
Wait a moment. I object to that.

MR. MOODY.

It has been suggested that it may appear hereafter on the testimony of Miss Lizzie Borden that it was her habit to unlock the door in the morning and leave the door on the spring lock only.

MR. ROBINSON.
I suppose that is not now before the Court

 MR. MOODY.

 We exclude it.

MASON, C.J.
The witness is yours unless something has escaped us. I tried very hard that there should be nothing.

(END OF DIRECT EXAMINATION)

Tuesday, June 6, 1893

Cross-Examination

Q. (By Mr. Robinson.) You were called Maggie?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. By Miss Emma and Miss Lizzie?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. But that was not unpleasant to you?

A. No, sir, it was not.

Q. Not at all offensive?

A. No, sir.

Q. Did not cause any ill-feeling or trouble?

A. No, sir.

Q. Did Mr. and Mrs. Borden call you by some other name?

A. Yes, sir, called me by my own, right name.

Q. How long had you been at the house living there?

A. Two years and nine months.

Q. Did you have any trouble there in the family?

A. No, sir.

Q. Not at all?

A. No, sir.

Q. A pleasant place to live?

A. Yes, sir, I liked the place.

Q. And for aught you know, they liked you?

A. As far as I know, yes.

Q. Treated you well?

A. Yes, sir, they did.

Q. It was a pleasant family to be in?

A. I don't know how the family was; I got along all right.

Q. You never saw anything out of the way?

A. No, sir.

Q. You never saw any conflict in the family?

A. No, sir.

Q. Never saw the least, --- any quarreling or anything of that kind?

A. No, sir, I did not.

Q. And during the whole time that you were there? You were there two and a half years, I think you said?

A. Yes, sir, two years and nine months.

Q. Now the daughters, Miss Emma and Miss Lizzie, usually came to the table, did they not, as the father and mother did?

A. No, sir, they did not.

Q. I thought you said they did.

A. No, sir, they did not.

Q. Didn't you say this morning that they ate at the table with the family?

A. Nobody asked me whether they did or not.

Q. You did not say so this morning?

A. No, sir, I don't remember anybody asked that question.

Q. Didn't they eat with the family?

A. Not all the time.

Q. But they did from time to time, and day to day, did they not?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. What?

A. Sometimes the family --- most of the time they did not eat with their father and mother.

Q. Did they get up in the morning as early as the father and mother?

A. No, sir.

Q. So they had their breakfast a little later?

A. Not all the time, --- sometimes. But sometimes they would be down with the family, more times they would not.

Q. How was it at dinner?

A. Sometimes at dinner; a good many more times they were not.

Q. Sometimes they were out?

A. I don't know where they were; I could not tell.

Q. You don't know whether out or in?

A. Sometimes I knew they were in the house.

Q. Were there some times when one would be at the table and the other was not?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Whether or not you heard Miss Lizzie talking with her mother, Mrs. Borden?

A. Yes, sir, she always spoke to Mrs. Borden when Mrs. Borden talked with her?

Q. Always did?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. The conversation went on in the ordinary way, did it?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. How was it this Thursday morning after they came downstairs?

A. I don't remember.

Q. Didn't they talk in the sitting-room?

A. I heard her talk as she came along.

Q. Who spoke?

A. Miss Lizzie and Mrs. Borden.

Q. Talking in the sitting-room?

A. Mrs. Borden asked some question and she answered very civilly. I don't know what it was.

Q. Who answered civilly?

A. Miss Lizzie answered.

Q. Answered properly, all right?

A. Yes, sir,

Q. When you heard them talking, they were talking calmly, the same as anybody else?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. There was not, so far as you knew, any trouble that morning?

A. No, sir, I did not see any trouble with the family.

Q. Where were you at that time?

A. I was in my kitchen.

Q. Was Mr. Borden there at that time?

A. No, sir, I don't think that he was.

Q. He had gone out at that time?

A. No, sir, I don't think he was out; I don't know where he was.

Q. I am talking now of Thursday morning when you heard Mrs. Borden and Lizzie talking together?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Then they got along congenially, did they?

A. Yes, sir, as far as I could see.

Q. And talked pleasant?

A. Yes, sir, as far as I could see. When Mrs. Borden talked to them, they talked to her.

Q. You waited on the table at times when they were all at the table?

A. Yes, sir, I put the meals on and rung the bell.

Q. Whenever they rang the bell you went in?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You heard them talking over things about Christmas time, didn't you?

A. I don't know; I did not stay much in the dining-room when the folks were eating at all.

Q. I don't mean that, but you heard them talking over about Christmas things?

A. No, sir, I don't remember that.

Q. Have you forgotten that?

A. No, sir, I did not.

Q. How was Lizzie towards Mrs. Borden if Mrs. Borden was not feeling well?

A. I don't know. Mrs. Borden was not particularly sick when I was there except twice.

Q. Did not Lizzie treat her properly and help her?

A. I did not see anything; I know that she was sick one time and none of them went into the room while she was sick.

Q. Haven't you testified before about this?

A. No, sir, I said when Mrs. Borden spoke to them, they spoke to her.

Q. You testified at the inquest?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Do you remember what you testified there?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Do you remember it all?

A. I think I do.

Q. Did you in answer to this question, "Did they talk pleasantly?" say "Yes, sir" and "they talked over things at Christmas, and if anything was the matter with Mrs. Borden, Lizzie did all she could for her"?

A. I did not know what was the matter between them.

Q. Didn't you testify that?
A. I don't remember anybody asking me that question.

Q. Do you say you did not?

A. I don't remember anybody asking me such a question.

Q. Mr. Knowlton was there asking you questions, was he not?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you answer this, "Did you know of any trouble between Miss Lizzie and her mother?" and say "No, sir, never a word in my presence"?

A. No, sir, I never heard them talking between them.

Q. And "they were talking pleasantly that Thursday morning in the sitting-room.

A. Yes, sir."

Q. That is so, is it?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You said, "I never heard a word that I could say was between the two."

A. No, sir, I never heard anything between them.

Q. You said "They seemed to get along congenially"?

A. Yes, sir, for all I saw.

Q. Is that so?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. But did they get along pleasantly, and "if anything was the matter with Mrs. Borden, Lizzie did all she could for her?" Is that so?

A. I don't know that Christmas was mentioned at all.

Q. Will you say that you did not say that?

A. No, sir.

Q. You won't say you did not say it?

A. No, sir.

Q. Where have you been living since you left the Borden house?

A. In New Bedford.

Q. Where?

A. Mrs. Hunt's.

Q. Where does Mrs. Hunt live? A. On Court Street.

Q. What is Mr. Hunt's occupation?

A. Keeper.

Q. Keeper of what?

A. Of the jail house.

Q. Then you have been at the jail, have you, helping work all the time?

A. Not in the jail.

Q. I don't mean in the jail, but at the keeper's house?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you have been there all the time?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And are still there employed?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You came right over from Fall River?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And have been there ever since?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You were under a recognizance to appear here, were you, to appear here as a witness?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And was the city marshal of Fall River one of your sureties?

A. Yes, sir; as I understand.

Q. And was the other one of the detectives, Mr. Seaver?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. So you have been in the family of Mr. Hunt, the keeper of the jail, all the time since?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. I suppose you have not had much talk with either Miss Lizzie or Miss Emma since that time?

A. No, sir.

Q. Or anybody representing them?

A. No, sir.

Q. You have seen some people that were on the other side of the case, haven't you?

A. I don't know what you mean.

Q. You have seen Mr. Knowlton since?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Where?

A. At Mr. Hunt's.

Q. How many times?

A. Once.

Q. When?

A. Last Thursday.

Q. And have you seen any of the officers besides?

A. No, sir; not ----

Q. Not to talk with them?

A. I don't remember to see any of the officers, not to talk to, I don't think.

Q. Have you talked with anybody but Mr. Knowlton?

A. And this other gentleman.

Q. This gentleman here?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Anybody else?

A. That is all.

Q. Do you think you have told us today just as you have twice before?

A. Yes, sir; I have told all I know and all I can tell.

Q. I don't ask you that. What I want to know is whether you have told it today just as you did before?

A. Well, I think I did, as far as I remember.

Q. What do you say now you did when you came in from out in the yard when you went out and were sick and vomited?

A. I commenced to wash my dishes.

Q. Let me finish the question. What did you do to the screen door when you came in?

A. I hooked it.

Q. Did you say so before at the other examination?

A. I think so.

Q. Do you know so?

A. I am not sure.

Q. You are not sure?

A. No, sir.

Q. Let me read and see if you said this: "When you came in from vomiting, did you hook the screen door then?" And the answer: "I couldn't tell, I don't know whether I did or not." Did you say so? A. Well, I must have hooked it because ---

Q. Well, that isn't it. Was that the way you testified: "I couldn't tell, I don't know whether I did or not"?

A. I don't know what I testified. I testified the truth as long as I remember. As far as I know I told the truth and nothing more.

Q. I do not imply that you did not. I merely want to know if you recall testifying over there at Fall River that you couldn't tell whether you hooked the door or not when you came in from vomiting?

A. Well, I suppose I don't know whether I did or not. It is likely I did for it was always kept locked.

Q. You say now that you do not positively recollect one way or the other?

A. Well, I won't say; I can't remember, whether I locked the screen door.

Q. You remember now that you testified that you did lock it, don't you, just now a few minutes ago?

A. Well, I generally locked the screen door.

Q. That isn't what I asked. You said a few minutes ago that you hooked it at that time, didn't you?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Well, now you say you don't know whether you did or not. Isn't that so?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You say now you don't know. Am I right?

A. I don't know whether you are or not.

Q. Well, will you tell which way it was?

A. No, sir.

Q. Did you hook it or did you not?

A. I know I must have hooked the door for I always ---

Q. No, that isn't it. Did you hook it or did you not?

A. I don't know whether I did or not.

Q. Do you say that Second Street is a quiet street?

A. No, sir; I didn't say no such thing.

Q. Well, is it a quiet street?

A. Well, I don't know; I didn't see any quarreling there.

Q. No, no; I don't mean quarreling, but the noise of travel?

A. Well, there is quite a lot of teams and hacks and so forth goes by there.

Q. And so if you were back in the kitchen, the rear end of the house, you would be farther away from it than anybody else in the house?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You said that Wednesday morning, I think, that you let Dr. Bowen in?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Whom did he come to see; somebody that was ill?

A. Yes, sir; he came there to see Mr. Borden, I suppose.

Q. Well, was Miss Lizzie complaining?

A. She said that morning that she was sick.

Q. You say that she was down at breakfast time that morning?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And about during the forenoon?

A. She was down before the dinner was served on the table.

Q. Well, she was down at breakfast time too, I think you said?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Sat down with them?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you don't know, of course, how much she ate? You don't know about that?

A. No, sir; I do not.

Q. You went out to meet some friends Wednesday night?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And did you go out alone?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And came home alone?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. How far did you go from the house?

A I couldn't tell. I went as far as Third Street, up Third Street. I went down Second Street, through Borden Street and up Third Street. I went down Main Street and up Main Street, and out as far as Morgan Street.

Q. And you got home about five minutes past ten, I think you said?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And there you found the lamp in the kitchen?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Which you had not lighted yourself; you had gone out before lamp-light?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you took that and went to bed?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you tell us what time (I think you did not) they had dinner the day before?

A. Wednesday?

Q. Yes.

A. Twelve o'clock.

Q. Twelve o'clock was the usual hour. There was a key to the side wooden door?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And do you know whether Mrs. Borden or anybody else had a key to it besides yourself?

A. I know Mrs. Borden had a key for it; Mrs. Borden got a key for it when I got mine.

Q. So there were two keys? A. Yes, sir.

Q. Where did you keep yours when you came into the house?

A. I hung it on a nail that was hanging down near the lamp in the kitchen --- the mantel-piece.

Q. That was your rule, to hang it there?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Do you know where the other one was kept?

A. No, sir; I do not.

Q. Now do you recall what you testified at the inquest about their eating together? I have asked you about it. Have you a clear memory about it now?

A. I don't know if they asked me anything about it.

Q. Well, were you asked this: "Did she generally get up to breakfast?" And you said: "Very seldom, she generally came down about nine o'clock."

A. Yes, sir.

Q. "And then helped herself to breakfast?"

A. Yes, sir.

Q. "Did she always eat at the same table with Mr. and Mrs. Borden?" And your answer: "Always did eat dinner and supper when she was in the house.

A. Yes, sir; she ate the meals when she was in the house.

Q. That is so, is it? "They always ate together when she was in the house, except when she was out on an errand." Is that so?

A. Yes, sir; they always ate at the same dining-room.

Q. Always ate together in the dining-room?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Dinner and supper. You had nothing to do, as I understand you, in the line of your work, mainly, except in the kitchen and in the wash-room below?

A. In the front entry -- back entry.

Q. You didn't have anything to do with the parlor at all?

A. No, sir.

Q. And nothing to do with the spare room above stairs?

A. No, sir.

Q. Or the rooms of Miss Lizzie or Miss Emma?

A. No, sir.

Q. And you didn't take care of Mr. and Mrs. Borden's room?

A. No, sir.

Q. And you had no charge at all, no care of the front part of the house?

A. No, sir.

Q. And seldom went in there?

A. No, sir; I never had no business there.

Q. And had no work to do there. And if Mr. and Mrs. Borden were in the house, and the door bell rang, they attended, one of them, to the door, and you did not go?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And even the little care of the rooms, such as the taking care of the toilet slops in the rooms of the daughters, you didn't see to it?

A. No, sir; I didn't have nothing to do to them.

Q. Nothing to do with them?

A. No, sir.

Q. And you didn't see to them even in the room of Mr. and Mrs. Borden?

A. No, sir.

Q. You could easily go to their room, could you not?
A. No, sir; except I would want the key -- except I would take the key.

Q. Then Mr. Borden kept ---
MR. MOODY -- Why not let her finish?

THE WITNESS -- No, sir; I didn't have nothing to do
to their rooms; there was nothing to take

me there. I had nothing to do to it. If they wanted me to go on any errand there they would let me have the key.

Q. Mr. and Mrs. Borden had a key? A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did they have more than one key to that door?

A. I don't know.

Q. They had one? A. Yes.

Q. I mean their bedroom door upstairs?

A. Yes, sir; I mean their bedroom.

Q. Their bedroom door. Going up the back stairs you would reach their bedroom door, and that key was kept on the mantel in the sitting-room unless it was in use up there?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. There is a bell that hangs there in Mrs. Borden's room, I suppose you know?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. An old bell?

A. Yes, sir; I have seen it.

Q. But that is not connected with the front door knob, is it?

A. I don't know anything about it.

Q. Did you ever hear it ring up there?

A. No, sir; I don't remember.

Q. The bell you did hear ring was downstairs?

A. I didn't hear any bell that morning.

Q. No, I don't mean any particular time.

A. No, sir; in the kitchen.

Q. But while you were there was that bell upstairs, to your knowledge, ever in use?

A. No, sir; I don't know anything about the bell upstairs. Always the bell I heard was in the kitchen.

Q. Well, that is it. All the bell you ever heard was in the kitchen?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now coming in at night on Wednesday night, you went to your room and rose in the morning at quarter past six?

A. I came down to the kitchen at quarter past six.

Q. Did you lock your door above?

A. No, sir.

Q. Was anybody else occupying any room in the upper part of the house at that time?

A. No, sir.

Q. On the third floor?

A. No, sir.

Q. You room up there?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You say if anybody was careless and slammed the screen door you could hear it?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. But it was easy enough for anybody to go in and out that door and not let you hear it, wasn't it?

A. Yes, sir; they could.

Q. Plenty easy?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Your window opened out into the yard?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now you speak about the time as 6.15 in the morning, quarter past six, on looking at the clock. How many clocks were there in the house?

A. Well, there is one in the sitting-room, one in the kitchen, one in my bedroom, and I think there was one in Mr. Borden's bedroom.

Q. Any other?

A. That is all I remember; all to my knowledge.

Q. Did you ever see a clock in the parlor?

A. Yes, sir; I think there was a clock in the parlor; but I am not sure.

Q. Do you recall whether there was a clock in Miss Lizzie's room or Miss Emma's room?

A. No, there might be there; I don't remember.

Q. You, don't know about that?

A. No, sir.

Q. There were clocks enough, weren't there?

A. Yes, sir; there was.

Q. One in the sitting-room, you said?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You prepared the breakfast Thursday morning, as I understand you, and will you tell us again what they had for breakfast?

A. They had some broth and mutton, johnny cakes, and coffee, and cookies, and butter, and so forth.

Q. There was butter on the table then, was there?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you don't say that there was no fruit? A. I don't remember of any fruit.

Q. You remember that you didn't put it on the table?

A. No, sir.

Q. Was it usually standing on the sideboard there?

A. Yes, sir; sometimes it was there.

Q. You said that Mrs. Borden came down into the kitchen, and you didn't recollect that she went into any other room than the sitting-room?

A. No, sir; I do not.

Q. But you don't know certainly about that, do you?

A. I know she went into the sitting-room, where ---

Q. You don't know where else she went?

A. No, sir; I do not.

Q. Now if nothing had happened that morning, Miss Sullivan, nothing unusual had happened that day, would there be any reason why you should remember that Thursday more than any other day?

A. What do you mean?

Q. About what happened, what little things were done?

A. Why, no; there was no reason that I should remember that day any more than any other day -- not before.

Q. Could you tell us just what Mrs. Borden did the Tuesday before when she came downstairs?

A. The Tuesday morning?

Q. Yes.
A. Why, she went in the sitting-room as usual.

Q. Well, not as usual. I want to know what you remember about it?
A. Why, the woman came downstairs and wanted to know what was for breakfast and so forth, and went into her sitting-room and stayed there until her breakfast was ready.

Q. Well, do you know what time of the morning Miss Lizzie came down Tuesday?

A. I don't know if she was in the house at all; I can't remember.

Q. You don't know whether she came down or didn't come down?

A. No, sir.

Q. And do you know, if she was in the house, anything about what she did Tuesday?

A. No, sir; I do not.

Q. Do you remember anything about what dress she had on?

A. Yes; she generally wore a light ---

Q. No, not generally; what did she have on Tuesday?

A. I don't remember what she had on Tuesday; I can't tell.

Q. Do you remember anything about Wednesday, what dress she had on?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. What was it?

A. It was a light blue.

Q. You say you don't remember Thursday?

MR.MOODY ---- Well, let her finish.

The WITNESS -- Wednesday morning she had a blue wrapper on her; skirt and basque.

Q, Now you say you do not remember on Thursday?

A. No, sir. I can't tell.

Q. Can't remember?

A. No, sir. I can't tell what dress the girl had on.

Q. Have you any recollection at all what dress she had on any part of Thursday? A. No, sir, excepting the afternoon I went to her room and she had on a pink wrapper.

Q. A pink wrapper in the afternoon?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Before that you can't tell anything about it?

A. No, sir; I couldn't.

Q. Now, Mr. Borden went out in the garden or under the pear trees in the morning at what time?

A. It might be seven o'clock or five minutes or ten minutes -- I can't tell what time it was.

Q. Was it before breakfast?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And where was Mr. Morse at that time?

A. I couldn't tell where he was.

Q. Is there a room connected with the kitchen beside the closet?

A. Why, there is the sitting-room, dining-room, closet and sink room.

Q. Anything else?

A. Front hall -- front entry.

Q. Small hall leading to the outside door? Is there a room there in the corner, the northeast comer?

A. Downstairs?

Q. Yes.

A. There is a parlor there.

Q. No; leading out from the kitchen?

A. There is a closet there.

Q. Well, you call it a closet?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Is that the only closet there is in the kitchen?

A. That is the closet, the kitchen closet. There is a little closet there, where the wood and coal was kept, and there is a sink room there where the refrigerator was.

Q. Then there is a closet, and that is quite a large closet, -- a sort of a pantry, wasn't it?

A. Well, I always called it the kitchen closet. I don't know what anybody else called it.

Q. You could go right into it?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And shelves around?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And did you have occasion to go in when you were preparing breakfast?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Regularly?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And when you were clearing away and were putting in food did you have occasion to go in there?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. That was a common thing, wasn't it?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You went in there that morning did you not?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And in and out that room several times?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. There was a window opening from that closet out into the backyard, was there not?

A. A window was there; I don't know whether it was open or shut.

Q. I don't mean whether it was exactly open, up or down, -- but a window that let the light in?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And there was a door which could be shut to that closet?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now while Mr. Borden was out in the back yard, do you know whether the door was hooked or not?

A. I didn't hook it.

Q. You didn't hook it?

A. No, sir.

Q. And you have not the least knowledge whether it was hooked or not, have you?

A. No, sir; I have not.

Q. And I think you have told us, just a moment ago that when you yourself went out into the yard at the vomiting time, that now you cannot say whether you hooked it or not when you came back?

A. I didn't hook it when I went out, for I couldn't.

Q. No; when you came in?

A. Well, I generally always hooked it.

Q. No, I did not ask you that. You have told us now that you cannot tell, haven't you, certainly?

A. Well, I am most sure that I hooked it, but I wouldn't say.

Q. You won't say?

A. I won't say.

Q. All the time that you were washing windows, that door was unhooked, wasn't it?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now what time did you begin to wash windows?

A. Well, as far as I remember -- my knowledge of it -- it was half past nine.

Q. Mr. Borden was gone down street, then?

A. Yes, sir, he had gone out of the house.

Q. He had gone out of the house?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And from the time you commenced at half past nine in the morning until you got through with the washing outside, that screen door was unhooked?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you made the suggestion to Miss Lizzie that she need not hook it because you would be around there to look after it?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now, as a matter of fact, you were not around there all the time to look after it, were you?

A. I didn't know as there was anybody to come into the kitchen, but I said I would be around there.

Q. You didn't anticipate any trouble, or anybody getting in? A. No, sir; I did not.

Q. You expected it would be all right?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And that is the reason you told her so?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You did not tell her to keep it so only to let you in, did you?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. That is what you wanted?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now let us see. You went out to the barn to get water several times, six or seven or more pails of water?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And that is while the screen door was unfastened?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You were washing; you went in and shut the windows in the sitting-room?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And the dining-room?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you do not know how you did leave the shutters in there, or the curtains?

A. Well, I didn't disturb the shutters or the curtains. The upper shutters were shut, I know they were, and the lower shutters I didn't disturb them; they was partly open, I suppose, -- I can't tell; but I let down the windows.

Q. Really, you don't know; you put the windows down, but how you left the lower part of the shutters you don't know?

A. Well, I know they was open a little.

Q. What is that?

A. I know they were partly open.

Q. They were partly open?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. When you first went out, as you got ready to go to work, you saw Mrs. Kelley's girl there?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you went over to the fence and talked with her?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Where was she?

A. She was over in her own yard.

Q. What part of the yard?

A. She was in the yard, front of the house, going to wash windows.

Q. She was over on the Second Street front?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. She was going to wash the windows in the front part of that house?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you went over to the fence in that comer and stood there talking with her?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. That was before you commenced to wash?

A. Yes, sir, I had the water and ---

Q. The screen door over on the other side of the house was open, unlocked, all that time?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you had left it so, hadn't you?

A. Yes, sir; I did.

Q. That was before you commenced to wash?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Can you tell me any reason why a person could not have walked into that door and you not seen him?

A. Why, of course they could.

Q. Then, also, at one time you went to washing the windows on the front end of the Borden house?

A. I washed them in the sitting-room first.

Q. I know, but you did at one time wash the end windows in the parlor?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And would there be any difficulty then in a person going into the side door when it was unhooked?

A. Yes, sir, anybody could come from the back yard, but not from the front.

Q. They could; no trouble at all. When you were talking with Mrs. Kelley's girl, the field was pretty clear, wasn't it? That is, there wasn't much in the way; you stood back to the Borden house, talking with the Kelley girl over the fence?

A. Yes, sir, I was.

Q. And you could not then see -- as you stood you could not see the front gate or the side gate or the side walk?

A. I think I could see the front gate; I am not sure.

Q. You could if you looked?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. But if you were talking off that way and the front door was down there, you could not see it, could you?

A. No, sir.

Q. You were talking to that girl?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Talking right straight to her?

A. Yes, sir; I was.

Q. When Mr. Borden went out that morning -- let Mr. Morse out, rather, -- you do not know yourself how that door was left, do you?

A. Well the door was hooked when I went out in the yard.

Q. That is all you know; the door was hooked when you went out at a later time in the yard?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. But who hooked it you do not know?

A. Well, I suppose Mr. Borden.

Q. No, don't suppose; you can suppose anything. You don't know that, do you?

A. No, sir.

Q. You had your breakfast in the dining-room?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. What part of the dining-room did you sit?

A. I sat at the table.

Q. Which side?

A. The south side, towards Dr. Kelley's.

Q. You sat on the south side of the dining-room?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And your back was towards the sitting-room?

A. My back was towards the sitting-room.

Q. You sat on the side of the table?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Whose place was that, ordinarily?

A. Mr. Borden's.

Q. That was where Mr. Borden ordinarily sat, with his back to the sitting-room wall?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And his face would be looking over towards Mrs. Churchill's?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You saw Mr. Borden go up after the breakfast time, -- take his key and go up the back stairs?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And how long he was gone you do not know?

A. No, sir; I do not.

Q. But he came down, and then he went off out of the house? A. I didn't see him going out that morning.

Q. But you knew he went?
A. I suppose he went out, because I did not see him in the house.

Q. And Mrs. Borden at that time was attending to dusting about?

A. I suppose so; I didn't see her dusting at that time.

Q. You did not go into the front part of the house at all, that morning, until the time when you went to the front door to unlock it? A. No, sir; not through the front part.

Q. I beg pardon?

A. No, sir; I didn't go from the dining-room.

Q. While you were washing the windows in the sitting-room and dining-room inside, you had not gone into the front hall that morning ---

A. No, sir, I did not.

Q. Until you heard the noise at the front door? A. No, sir; I did not.

Q. And you certainly did not then go up the front stairs?

A. No, sir, I did not.

Q. And the last time, then, that you saw Mr. Borden, was when he was going upstairs with his pitcher and his key?

A. Yes, sir, that is what I remember.

MR. ROBINSON.
Until he came back to the front door, -- you understand that; you do not want to mislead her, of course.


MR. MOODY.

Yes, I mean until he came to the front door, -- (to the witness). You understand that?

Q. And you have said, I think, and made it plain, that when you suggested to Miss Lizzie that she need not hook the side door, she did not hook it?

A. No, sir; she did not.

Q. You know she did not, because you could get in there, -- in and out? A. Yes, sir.

Q. When you went to the barn to get the water, you got it at that faucet under the stairs, didn't you?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. As you went in at the door you would go around under the stairs?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And draw the water in your pail?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now, could you see much of the yard when you were in there? A. I could see facing out; that was all.

Q. What?

A. I could see if I was looking out; that was all.

Q. If you were looking out. You were getting water, weren't you? A. Yes, sir.

Q. You were really honestly at work, of course? A. Yes, sir.

Q. You were not upon the watch looking out for people?

A. No, sir.

Q. Watching your work?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. How many pails of water did you get in all from the barn?

A. Well, I couldn't remember.

Q. Did you say something like six or seven?

A. Yes, I probably got that much. It might be more, it might be less.

Q. It might be more than six or seven?

A. Yes. I can't tell.

Q. In the first place, you had been out in the barn to get this stick and came in again?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And then got your things together? A. No, sir, I didn't.

Q. Well, how was it?

A. I went out --- I went downstairs and got a pail, and took the pail outdoors full of water, and went in the barn and got the handle of the brush, the stick, whatever you call it.

Q. On the outside of the parlor you say the blinds were closed when you went around there?

A. I know they was closed on the front part any way.

Q. But you can't tell us at all whether the parlor curtains or shutters on the inside were closed?

A. I can't remember how they were.

Q. Whether anybody was in that room you can't tell?

A. No sir, I couldn't.

Q. You didn't see anybody come in there at all?

A. No, sir. I didn't see anybody around the house.

Q. When you walk along on the north side of the house on the walk, -- you know where I mean, coming from the street in --

A. Yes, sir, I know what you mean.

Q. --- how high is the window-seat of the dining-room? How does it come with reference to your body or your head?

A. I don't know. It is quite high, I think.

Q. Can't see in, can you?
A. I can't see, except anybody had been at the window I could see them, I guess.

Q. And as you are walking in along there from the street and going into the back door, the window-seats are up so high and the walk so low that you can't see unless a person is right up to the window?

A. I think so. I don't remember how it was.

Q. Now, what you say is that you went into the kitchen to get the dipper after you had got through with the outside, to rinse it off, I suppose?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And when you went into the kitchen you didn't see anybody?

A. No, sir, I didn't.

Q. That is all there was about that?

A. Yes.

Q. Whether there was anybody in the dining-room or anybody in the sitting-room or elsewhere, you don't know?

A. No, sir, I don't.

Q. You were not taking any pains to find out, were you?

A. No, sir. I wasn't thinking of anybody in the house.

Q. Didn't think of any trouble at all?

A. No, sir, I didn't.

Q. Then after you got through did you go out to the barn again to put the tools away or any part of them?

A. No, sir. I put the handle of the brush in the barn before I came in.

Q. What I mean is, that was after you got through outside?

A. Yes.

Q. You went to the barn again?

A. Yes.

Q. And put the handle in there?

A. Yes.

Q. And then when you came in you hooked that side door?

A. Yes, sir, I did.

Q. Had you ever gone to let Mr. Borden in on any other day at the front door?

A. No, sir. I don't remember.

Q. What?

A. No, sir, I did not.

Q. Let us see if we understand it right. All the time that you lived there did you ever go when he came to the door and couldn't unlock the door?

A. I don't remember.

Q. Don't remember that you did?

A. No, sir, I don't.

Q. Now, you say that you unlocked the bolts?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You didn't open the parlor door, did you?

A. The parlor door?

Q. Yes.

A. No, sir. I didn't have nothing to do with it.

Q. You don't know anything about it?

A. No, sir, I don't...

Q. Whether there was anybody in there or not?

A. No, sir, I didn't.

Q. The door from the sitting-room into the parlor was closed, wasn't it?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. All the time the door from the hall into the parlor was closed?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You had had no occasion up to that time to go to that front door that morning or anywhere in the front of the hall?

A. No, sir.

Q. Are you very certain about that?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. There is no mistake about that?

A. No, sir. I didn't go to that front door that morning until Mr. Borden came in.

Q. After you let Mr. Borden in you say you heard Miss Lizzie laugh?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you say she was upstairs somewhere?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you didn't see her on the stairs?

A. No, sir.

Q. Didn't see her at all?

A. No, sir. I didn't look.

Q. You heard the sound of the laugh?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Was that all?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now, after you let him in where did you go?

A. I went into the sitting-room.

Q. And then you say that you next saw her come from where?

A. From the hall, from the front entry into the sitting-room.

Q. You saw her come out of the front hall, as you recall it?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And there was talk with her father about the mail?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Well, it was all pleasant talk every way?

A. Yes, as far as I know.

Q. Everything was all right?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. No sort of scolding either side?

A. No, sir.

Q. And what did he say about the mail?

A. I don't know what he said. I remember she asked him was there any mail. I don't know what he said. I wasn't paying any attention.

Q. You don't know what was said?

A. Only I heard her tell her father her mother had a note and gone out.

Q. Did you hear what he said about that?

A. No, sir.

Q. You went off about your work?

A. Yes, sir. I was washing my windows.

Q. You were not listening. It wasn't anything unusual to hear them talk?

A. No, sir.

Q. After you heard him say there was no mail for her do you remember what she said to him?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. But you don't remember any reply that he made?

A. No, sir. I heard the man talking, but I don't remember what he said.

Q. You heard him talking?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. What he said you don't know?

A. No, sir, I didn't.

Q. Then he sat down?

A. Sat down on his chair at the head of the lounge.

Q. In the dining-room? A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you saw Miss Lizzie go to work and iron some handkerchiefs? A. Yes, sir.

Q. Well, that was nothing unusual, was it? A. No, sir, it was not.

Q. They used to wash their own handkerchiefs? A. She always did.

Q. To that extent?

A. Only to that extent.

Q. And iron them?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And she had the common iron board?

A. No, sir. Well, --

Q. I don't mean the large one, but a small ironing board?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And ironed on the dining-room table?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You saw her about that?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you don't mean to say that you watched her movements at all that morning any more than any other morning?

A. Why, no, sir, I did not.

Q. Not at all?

A. No, sir, I did not.

Q. And you didn't even know about the fire in the stove?

A. No, sir. I didn't look at the fire at all.

Q. What kind of fire did you make in the morning?

A. I made a coal fire, not a very big fire.

Q. It was hot weather and you didn't need much fire after breakfast?

A. No, sir.

Q. You didn't look in the stove to see how it was?

A. No, sir, I did not.

Q. Were the flats on the stove?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Who put them on?

A. Miss Lizzie, I suppose. I didn't put them on.

Q. You say that when she came down, that is, before you went out in the yard, she spoke about breakfast?

A. Yes, sir. I asked her what did she want for her breakfast. She says she didn't think she wanted any breakfast, but she felt as if she should take something, she would have some coffee and cookies.

Q. I suppose the table wasn't set for breakfast, was it? A. No, sir. I had all the things cleared off the table.

Q. So all she had was a cup of coffee?
A. That is what she said that she thought, some coffee and cookies.

Q. Well, she didn't usually have but one, did she?

A. That is all, sir.

Q. So she had a cup of coffee and some cookies. Were those sugar or molasses cookies?

A. I don't know what they were.

Q. Some you made?

A. No, sir, they came from the bakery.

Q. You didn't, of course, stay to see her eat them?

A. No, sir.

Q. You didn't mind anything about it? A. No, sir, I didn't.

Q. You were out in the yard ten or fifteen minutes, you say?

A. Yes, sir, I was about that much out in the yard.

Q. But it didn't take ten or fifteen minutes to drink that cup of coffee and eat those cookies, did it?

A. I don't know anything about it.

Q. What time did you first see the flats on the stove?

A. I don't remember anything about it when I seen them on there.

Q. Did you see them on before you went out into the yard?

A. No, sir, I did not.

Q. After you came in?

A. I don't remember to take any notice of the flats at all, only when I saw her ironing.

Q. Do you have the least idea whether while you were out she was reading or what? A. No, sir, I don't know what she was doing. I can't tell you.

Q. Now, you went upstairs after you got through your work? A. Yes, sir.

Q. And she was in the dining-room ironing handkerchiefs? A. Yes, sir.

Q. The dining-room door from the sitting-room you think was open? A. Yes, sir, from the dining-room into the sitting-room was open.

Q. Perhaps I stated wrongly. From the dining-room into the kitchen?

A. Yes.

Q. You think that was open?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Wasn't the kitchen warm that morning?

A. Why, I suppose so.

Q. Do you think you surely noticed that the door from the kitchen into the dining- room was open?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Feel confident about that?

A. Yes, sir. I saw her going back into the dining-room. Whether she shut it after I had gone out of the kitchen or not, I can't tell.

Q. You went directly upstairs?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And got up there, you think, about three or four minutes before 11 o'clock?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you heard no noise or any trouble, and you hadn't seen anybody about the house?

A. No, sir, I didn't.

Q. And where the different persons in the house were you didn't know?

A. No, sir, except Mr. Borden and Lizzie in the sitting-room.

Q. Then you heard Miss Lizzie call you?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Upstairs?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You were up there?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Do you remember the exact words that she used?

A. She says, "Maggie, come down," and she hollered with such a voice that I says,

"What is the matter?" She says, "Come down quick. Father is dead. Somebody came in and killed him."

Q. Now, when you gave it before today, did you give it just like that? A. I think so.

Q. Did you say "Father is killed"?

A. "Father is killed" or "dead." I can't tell which of the two, -- just the same any way.

Q. It means the same, but I am trying to see if you could remember the words. You don't quite, do you?

A. I think she said, "Father is killed; somebody came in."

Q. Other times you have said, haven't you, a little something different? It may mean the same.

A. I don't know. I think it is the two words she said, either dead or killed. I can't tell which of them.

Q. Now, when you came down were you excited? A. Why, yes, sir.

Q. You really were, weren't you? A. Yes, sir.

Q. You found then that Mr. Borden was either very badly injured or else he was dead?

A. I didn't know what was the matter. She said he was either dead or killed. I couldn't tell which of the two words now, of course. She told me to go after the doctor, and so I did.

Q. You started right after Dr. Bowen?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. When you got over to Dr. Bowen's, going from there you left Miss Lizzie at the bottom of the stairs right at that side door?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Of course, you went out, and as far as you know the screen door was not locked? A. I couldn't tell whether it was locked or not.

Q. You can't really tell very clearly about what things happened right afterwards, can you?

A. Well, as far as I remember. I can tell all I remember.

Q. A good deal of excitement?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You went as fast as you could; you say you think you ran over to Mrs. Bowen's and learned that the doctor was away?

A. Yes.

Q. And then you came back to the house?

A. Yes.

Q. And then she asked you to go for Alice Russell?

A. She asked me if I knew where Alice Russell lived.

Q. And then did you go as fast as you could down there?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. When you came back to the house whom did you find there?

A. Miss Lizzie and Mrs. Churchill and Dr. Bowen.

Q. Do you know which one got there first, whether Mrs. Churchill or Dr. Bowen? A. I don't know.

Q. You found them when you got there?

A. I know Dr. Bowden was stepping out of his carriage as I was coming up Second Street.

Q. Then Mrs. Churchill got there first, didn't she? A. I don't know.

Q. Well, when you got into the house Mrs. Churchill was there?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And when you got to the house Dr. Bowen was just getting out of his carriage?

A. No, sir. Dr. Bowen was in the house before I was. As I was coming down Second Street, I saw Dr. Bowen stepping out of his carriage.

Q. As you saw him down the street he was just stepping out of his carriage?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you saw him go in the house?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you see Mrs. Churchill go into the house?

A. I don't remember.

Q. But she was in the house?

A. She was in the house when I went in there.

Q. There was a talk, and Miss Lizzie was upon the lounge in the dining-room, was she, part of the time?

A. She was in the kitchen when I came back.

Q. But after that?

A. Yes. When I came downstairs from being up she was in the dining-room on the lounge.

Q. And Miss Russell with her?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And they fanning her, taking care of her?

A. I don't know. There was a crowd there, and I passed out in the kitchen.

Q. You didn't see any blood on her?

A. No, sir. I don't remember seeing any blood.

Q. Didn't see any blood, did you?

A. No, sir, I did not.

Q. You were round there all the forenoon?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And she was about there, lying on the lounge?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And walking about?

A. No, sir. I guess she went upstairs to her room.

Q. Do you know who went up with her?

A. I don't know.

Q. I think I asked you if you saw any blood upon her anywhere?

A. No, sir.

Q. Face or hands or anywhere?

A. No, sir, I didn't.

Q. And her hair, was that all in order properly?

A. As far as I can remember I didn't see any difference.

Q. Didn't see any difference at all?

A. No, sir.

Q. You simply say that you didn't see anybody come with a note?

A. No, sir, I did not.

Q. Easy enough for anybody to come with a note to the house, and you not know it, wasn't it?

A. Well, I don't know if a note came to the back door that I wouldn't know.

Q. But they wouldn't necessarily go to the back door, would they?

A. No. I never heard anything about a note, whether they got it or not. I don't know.

Q. Don't know anything about it, and so you don't undertake to say it wasn't there?

A. No, sir.

Q. Will you fix the time when you got through washing the windows outside?

A. Why, I can't tell anything about it.

Q. Can't tell very near any way, can you?

A. No, sir, I can't. I don't know anything about the time, and I didn't take no notice of any time. I didn't have no occasion.

Q. Well, a good many things that day aren't very clear in your mind, are they, clear in your recollection?

A. As far as I remember; as far as I know.

Q. But you are not certain of a good many things?

A. Well, I am not certain about the time, because I never noticed anything about the clock or anything else except 11 o'clock. I know I noticed that.

Q. Did you see anybody on Second Street when you went out after Dr. Bowen?

A. I don't remember to see anybody the first time, but I remember I thought there was a man asked me some time --

Q. I don't care about the conversation. Did you see the man?

A. Yes, I think I did.

Q. And where was he?

A. I recollect his asking me if Mr. Borden was hurt.

Q. That was later. I mean when you went out the first time? A. No, sir, I didn't see any man.

Q. When you went to go upstairs with Mrs. Churchill, did you pass through the sitting- room or pass through the dining-room and around to the right into the hall?

A. Yes. I went through the dining-room and into the door of the sitting-room out to the hall.

Q. That is what I want to know, as to whether you went from the kitchen door right straight through the sitting-room to the hall?

A. No, sir, I went from the kitchen to the dining-room.

Q. Went across the comer of the sitting-room into the hall?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And at that time Mr. Borden was covered up with a sheet?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you hadn't been in to see him?

A. No, sir.

Q. Miss Lizzie was in the kitchen; you left her there when you and Mrs. Churchill started to go upstairs?

A. Yes, sir, I think so.

Q. So when Miss Lizzie went upstairs Mr. Borden was all covered up just as he was when you went, wasn't he?

A. Yes, must be.

Q. So when she went through the dining-room into the hall she had no more chance to see him than you had?

A. No, sir.

Q. Now after you got through washing windows and washed up inside the sitting-room and dining-room, what next did you do before you went upstairs?

A. I washed out the cloths I had in washing the windows, hung them behind the stove, I think, and then I went upstairs.

Q. Have you any idea what time it was when Mr. Borden came into the house?

A. I cannot fix the time, but I think by my time then, the work I did, it must have been around half past ten.

Q. But you went upstairs after you got through and cleaned up your cloths, got the cloths cleaned up that you had, and put the things away?

A. That was after Mr. Borden came in.

Q. And when you got up; there it was three or four minutes before eleven.

A. Yes, sir.

Q. See if I understand you about another thing? On Wednesday morning it was that Miss Lizzie came down and complained and did not want much breakfast.

A. She did not say anything about breakfast, but she said she was sick all night.

Q. That she was sick all night?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. I think you said in answer to some question put to you by the other side, that night you did not hear any of them come up, you were up in your room, but did not hear them.

A. No, sir, I did not.

Q. Did you learn that Mrs. and Mrs. Borden were ill?

A. They told me that morning.

Q. You did not hear any one of the three?

A. No, sir, I did not.

Q. Miss Lizzie was about the house that forenoon not doing anything in particular?

A. I saw her around the house before dinner. I saw her down in the kitchen at breakfast time and before dinner was served on the table.

Q. That is the day you said she had on the light blue wrapper?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did she have that on when she came down in the morning?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And kept it on during the forenoon and had it at the dinner table?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And that day you remember it very clearly?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And the dinner was at 12 o'clock?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Do you remember seeing her about that same day again, later in the day, Wednesday?

A. No, sir, I don't remember.

Q. Don't quite remember whether you saw her in the afternoon or not?

A. No, sir, I did not see her.

Q. I used the word "wrapper".

A. It was a basque and skirt.

Q. If you will tell me what the dress was?

A. It was a basque and a skirt.

Q. It was a man's mistake. Was it a blouse, as some one at my right says?

A. Yes, sir, a loose blouse with a belt round it.

Q. To state it all right let me ask, what was it, a blouse and skirt?

A. I don't know the name, -- a loose skirt with a belt round it.

Q. Was the skirt or waist or blouse of the same color?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Do you know whether she had any ribbon about it or not?

A. No, sir.

Q. Can't remember the style?

A. I think it was a belt, I cannot tell. I don't know whether it as a belt or ribbon.

RE-DIRECT EXAMINATION

Q. (By Mr. Moody) Is this dress that you are speaking of that she had on Wednesday the one you referred to as having been made in the spring? A. Yes, sir.

Q. And with a dark blue figure in it?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Between the breakfast hour on the Wednesday and the time you saw Miss Lizzie Borden at dinner, did you see her anywhere?

A. Between breakfast and dinner?

Q. Yes.

A. I don't remember of seeing her any more.

Q. Where she was in the meantime you don't know?

A. No, sir, I don't.

Q. When was this occasion when Mrs. Borden was sick and neither of the girls went into her room?

A. I was not long in the house then, --- probably two or three months.

Q. How long was she ill at the time?

A. Only one day.

Q. A word or two about your present residence. You understand that you are detained as a witness by the Commonwealth in the place in which you now are?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Have you been permitted to go in and out evenings?

A. I go in and out all I please.

Q. And live in the family of the sheriff, the keeper of the jail? And do the work in that household, do you?

A. I do the cooking up to this time.

Q. Did you remain at the house after the homicide any length of time?

A. I stayed there. I went out Thursday night and slept out in Mrs. Miller's girl's house, and Friday night I slept in the house.

Q. You mean Mrs. Miller's house with the girl?

A. With the servant. I slept with her Thursday night.

Q. On Thursday night?

A. Yes, sir, and I came back Friday morning, stayed there all through the time and did the work and Friday night I went out and came back and slept in the house.

Q. In the Borden house?

A. Yes, sir, and Saturday night I left for good as I thought, and came back Monday and Mr. Miller said I should not leave the house until he came and took me out.

Q. You did not stay there Saturday night?

A. No, sir, -- or Sunday night.

Q. You were not there Sunday morning?

A. No, sir.

Q. Were you there Sunday at all for any part of the day?

A. No, sir, I came there Monday morning.

Q. Did Mrs. Borden have any habit -- you can answer this yes or no and nothing more -- of telling you when she went out.

MR. ROBINSON. MR. MOODY.

MASON, C.J. MR. MOODY. MASON, C.J.

Wait a moment: I object to it. I simply did not want the witness to answer yet.

My question was objectionable even as a preliminary one, I will modify it.

(After a short pause) Well, it may raise the whole question. We will leave it there.

It is excluded.
Nothing further from this witness.
We will stop here and let the officers be sworn.

The Court at 4:55 P.M. adjourned until 9 o'clock, Thursday morning, June 8th.

BRIDGET SULLIVAN WAS RECALLED ON THURSDAY, JUNE 8, 1893 Beginning page 332 of the Trial Transcript.

Q. (By Mr. Robinson). Miss Sullivan, I forgot one or two subjects that I thought to ask you about until now. I think you said yesterday that you went down in the cellar with the officers after you found that Mr. and Mrs. Borden were killed.

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And how many officers went down with you?

A. I think there was three.

Q. Do you know who they were?

A. I didn't know then who they were, but I do now.

Q. And who were they?

A. There was officer Doherty and the assistant marshal and officer Medley.

Q. Now as I understand it, to be, officer Doherty and the assistant marshal, -- is that Mr. Fleet?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And the other one was Mr. Medley?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Do you know whether anyone else went down?

A. I don't remember.

Q. Did they go down and look about in the cellar?

A. Yes, sir: I went down with them: they asked me to go with them.

Q. Did you show them anything?

A. No, sir: I went down -- I went in the rooms in the cellar with them, and in a box

there was some hatchets, and they took them out of it.

Q. Where were those hatchets?

A. They were in the cellar, in the room where Mr. Borden kept the wood for the furnace.

Q. Was that in the same part of the cellar where the steam heater stands?

A. It was in the room alongside the heater.

Q. I understand you to say it was in the room alongside of that in which the steam heater was?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Those three men, Mr. Doherty, Mr. Fleet and Mr. Medley, were the ones who went down with you?

A. I think they was. I didn't know them: I learned since that they were.

Q. You know now?

A. Yes, sir: I heard they were officers.

Q. Well, you have seen the same men again several times?

A. Yes, sir, but I wouldn't know them again, until I was told they were the men.

MR. KNOWLTON. What did you say?

THE WITNESS. I wouldn't know the men again, but I heard they were the officers that went down with me.

Q. And you subsequently found out who they were?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you show them where the hatchets were?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Where did you show them?

A. They was in a box in the cellar, in the room in there.

Q. And did you take them out?

A. No, sir: I did not.

Q. Are you sure about that?

A. No, sir: I didn't put my hands at all on them. I don't think I put. my hands on the hatchets at all.

Q. Well, are you sure about that?

A. (Emphatically). Yes, sir, I am.

Q. Now, you say it was so?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Who did take them out of the box?

A. I couldn't tell you who took them out.

Q. Did you see them taken out?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. How many?

A. Three, I guess. I don't know how many there was.

Q. What?

A. I think there was three.

Q. Did you have them in your hands at all?

A. No, sir, I did not.

Q. Those three men were there all the time?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. What was done with them?

A. I don't know.

Q. Well, now, don't you know?

A. No, sir, I don't.

Q. Didn't you stay with the men?

A. Why, I didn't stay there all the afternoon.

Q. Well, I assumed not.

A. When I showed them the hatchets I went upstairs to the kitchen.

Q. What time in the afternoon was this that you showed them?

A. I couldn't tell you anything about the time.

Q. It was not in the afternoon at all, was it?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. What? A. Yes, sir.

Q. Twelve o'clock, wasn't it?

A. I don't know what time it was: it was after the murders were discovered, sometime.

Q. What?

A. Some time after the murders were discovered.

Q. Well, wasn't it right after?

A. Not quite right after. I suppose it must be some time after.

Q. Wasn't it before twelve o'clock?

A. I couldn't tell you anything at all about the clock, what time it was or what it wasn't, but I know it was after the discovering of the murders.

Q. Was it after Dr. Bowen got back the second time?

A. I don't know when Dr. Bowen got back at all.

Q. I don't mean the clock as to the minute, but did it come after that?

A. I couldn't tell you anything about it.

Q. And you did not know what the officers did with those axes or hatchets ---

A. No, sir, I did not.

Q. Listen a minute --- (completing question) right at that time?

A. No, sir: they took them out: what they did to them I don't know.

Q. Where did they carry them out, that you saw?

A. Well, I think they come upstairs: I don't know where they went to. I guess they

went in the other rooms: I didn't notice.

Q. Into what they call the wash room?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you see them laid out there on the floor?

A. No, sir, I don't remember to see the hatchets again.

Q. Did you stay there as long as they did?

A. I don't remember whether I did or not.

Q. What dress did you have on that morning?

A. I had a calico dress.

Q. What color?

A. Blue calico.

Q. Blue calico?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did it have any figure on it?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. What kind of a figure?

A. Well, it is what I call a clover leaf

Q. Would you call it a light blue or a dark blue?

A. It was a dark blue, dark indigo blue.

Q. And was the clover leaf of white or dark color?

A. White.

Q. White clover leaf in a dark blue ground?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Was it a dark blue ground or a light blue ground?

A. It was an indigo blue calico.

Q. Was the waist, or this portion, the upper portion of the dress, of the same material as the skirt?

A. Yes, sir,

MR. MOODY. This is her dress you are speaking of, Miss Bridget's dress?

MR. ROBFNSON. Yes.

Q. I am speaking about your own dress now: you understand me? \

A. Yes, sir, I know what you are speaking about.

Q. Did you keep it on all day?

A. Yes, sir: until the afternoon.

Q. Well, that is not all day?

A. Well, I kept it on until I got a chance to change it, after all the fuss was over.

Q. When did you change it?

A. I couldn't tell what time it was.

Q. Well, was it in the afternoon?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And what dress did you put on then?

A. I put a gingham dress on.

Q. Gingham? A. Yes, sir.

Q. And what was the general color of that?

A. It was a blue gingham.

Q. Check --- plaid?

A. Plain.

Q. Plain?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. What do you mean --- all one color?

A. Yes, sir, with a white border on it.

Q. What is that?

A. Yes, sir, the gingham was plain, with a white border to it.

Q. Plain, with a white border?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Well, where was the border? I don't understand about it.

A. It was trimmed at the bottom with two borders.

Q. But the whole of the dress was a bluish color?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And the border, was that a part of the cloth itself or was it a braid that was put on?

A. Part of the cloth.

Q. And the waist of the same color?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Was that a darker or lighter blue than you had on in the morning?

A. Lighter.

Q. Quite a good deal lighter?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you keep that on the rest of the day?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. After that?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you stay in all afternoon, in the house?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Well, I don't mean whether you were generally about the house, but did you go out of the house at all?

A. I don't remember. I went out on errands in the afternoon.

Q. Where did you go?

A. I went over to Mrs. Miller's.

Q. Which is just across the street?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And of course you went over the street and then came back?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And at that time you had on this lighter blue dress?

A. No, sir, I didn't.

Q. Well, did you have on the morning dress?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You had not changed it then?

A. No, sir.

Q. Do you know what time of the afternoon that was?

A. I don't know; I couldn't tell you.

Q. Do you think you went across the street more than once?

A. Yes sir, I went three times that day across the street.

Q. Well, I mean in the afternoon?

A. No, sir, only once.

Q. While you were at the house there, during the two years and nine months you lived there, was there some burglary there or robbery?
A. Yes, sir.

Q. When was that?

MR. KNOWLTON.
Wait a minute. I pray your Honors judgment as to that question.

MASON, C.J.
If it is preliminary it may be proper.

Q. When was it?
A. Twelve months before that time, I guess.

Q. Twelve months?
|
A. Yes, sir; I think it was; I am not sure.

Q. Did it occur in the day time or night? A. In the daytime.

MR. KNOWLTON. MASON, C.J.
MR. ROBINSON. MASON, C.J.

MR. ROBINSON.

MASON, C.J. MR. ROBINSON.

I pray your Honor's judgment.

What is the question?
The question was, did it occur in the daytime or night.

The Court is of the opinion that it is too long before to be material. If it has occured within a few days it would be a different matter.

In one phase of the question it seems to me it is material --- if the Court will allow me to state it. This house was robbed right in the middle of the day, when this woman and all the rest were in the house, three of them, three of the inmates of the family; and it was right in the middle of the day when this transpired.

The Court think it is not competent.

I want to save my rights on that point, if your Honors please; and I also now ask her in regard to any burglary at the barn, later than that.

Q. Any breaking and entering of the bar, do you know about that?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. How long was that after the other occurance?

A. I think it was in the fall after the burglary was in the house. I don't know what time, I can't say what time of the year. I can't remember what time of the year it was about the barn.

Q. And how long was it before Mr. and Mrs. Borden were killed?

A. I can't remember. It may have been a few months, or five or six months; I don't know anything about it. I can't describe about any of the times.

Q. You cannot fix it?

A. No, sir.

Q. Did it occur in the daytime or night time?

A. Night time.

MR. KNOWLTON. MASON, C.J.
MR. ROBINSON.

MR. KNOWLTON.

MR. ROBINSON.

I pray your Honors judgment as to that inquiry. It is too long before the transaction.

I would like to save it, then. I believe I have stated fully enough the purpose of the inquiry. It sufficiently appears in the testimony (in order to make it clear) that this witness was in the house at the time. That is shown.

I should not have objected, if it had appeared, to the question being put. I do not understand it has appeared except by your statement and your offer to show that.

Well, I would like to have the testimony read to see whether I am right or not.

(The testimony was read, beginning at the question: "While you were at the house there, etc ." through the question. "Did it occur in the daytime or night?")

Q. Let me show you this cellar plan, the floor and the room in the cellar. Do you get the idea about it? There is the front end of the house over there, and this will be on the side towards Mrs. Churchill's, and that the side towards Mrs. Kelly's. Now will
you look at that plan and see if you can tell in which of those rooms the axes or hatchets were found? A. No, sir, I couldn't tell you anything about it.

Q. You cabbot tell anything about the plan?

A. No, sir.

Q. It doesn't help you a bit?

A. No, sir, not at all.

Q. And I omitted yesterday to ask you about where you came down stairs, as Miss Lizzie had called you, as you were upstairs right after eleven o'clock ---
A. Yes, sir.

Q. You came down stairs and found her standing at the wooden door leaning up against that?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now what was she doing?

A. She wasn't doing nothing.

Q. Was she excited?

A. She seemed excited to me more than I ever seen her before, but not crying.

Q. What do you say?

A. Yes, sir; she seemed excited to me more than I ever saw her before.

Q. Was she crying?

A. No, sir.

Q. Are you right about that?

A. Yes, sir; I am.

Q. Have you ever said differently about it?

A. No, sir; I never said no different.

Q. I ask you again if you didn't testify before the inquest?

A. No, sir, I did not.

Q. No, you don't understand me. Didn't you testify at the inquest, --- give your testimony over there?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. I do not mean the second time when you went into the District Court. You know what I mean; I mean the very first time.
A. Yes, sir, I know what you mean.

Q. Now let me read and ask you if you didn't say this. The questions were asked you by Mr. Knowlton, weren't they?
A. Yes, sir.

Q. "Was the screen door open then?" "I don't know, I couldn't say. She was leaning against the inside door that locks, the large door." Is that right?
A. Yes, sir.

Q. "Not the screen door but the regular door." "Yes, sir." Is that right?
A. I said the inside door was open, but I didn't say anything about the screen door only I couldn't tell whether it was locked or not.

Q. Well, the question is that she was leaning against the regular door, and not against the screen door and to that you said Yes. That is correct, isn't it?
A. Yes, sir.

Q. "How did she seem?" Answer: She seemed to be excited more than I ever saw her." That is right, isn't it?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. "Was she crying?" "Yes, sir, she was crying." A. Well, that must be wrong; I couldn't say that.

Q. That must be wrong?

A. Yes, sir. I didn't say that, for I couldn't.

Q. So your memory is better today then it was then?

A. I don't care what my memory is, I didn't see the girl crying.

Q. You don't care anything about it?

A. No, sir.

Q. You don't care about your memory?

A. Yes, I care about that.

Q. Well, you want to be right, don't you, Miss Sullivan?

A. Yes, sir, I do.

Q. Do you say today that you did not testify so?

A. No, sir; I don't think I testified that, that she was crying.

Q. Will you swear you didn't say that?

A. I swear I didn't see her crying.

Q. You swear you didn't testify to that.

A. I am sure I didn't.

Q. Then that is not correct?

A. No, sir.

Bridget Sullivan was re-called on ........

Q. (By Mr. Moody.) This handerkerchief was not here, or under our control at the time the witness was on the stand. Have you seen such a handkerchief as that before? (Showing dark, old handkerchief.)
A. Yes, sir.

Q. What was it commonly used for and by whom?

A. Mrs. Borden used to use handkerchiefs the same as dusters is.

Q. Did she use it as a pocket handkerchief?

A. Mr. Borden used them as pocket hankerchiefs, and Mrs Borden, when they got worn out, took them as dust rags.

MR. MOODY. A single question was omitted and which a very careful examination of the testimony shows was not put in.

When you went out to wash the windows, Bridget, how did you find the screen door. A. It was locked I think.

Q. Locked with the hook of course? A. Yes, sir.

Q. (By Mr. Robinson) Did you tell us about that before, do you remember?

A. Yes, sir, I think the door was locked as I went out to wash the windows.

Q. You told us that the other day when you came here?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And then you left it unlocked?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And all the time you were out, as you told us before, it was unlocked, unhooked?

A. Yes, sir.

MR. ROBINSON. That is all for the present.